People meaning

pē'pəl
A person's family, relatives, or ancestors.

Where are your people from?

noun
4
1
People are those belonging to a place, religion, nation, race, language, class or culture.

An example of people is those living on the east coast.

An example of people is Christians.

An example of people is Italians.

An example of people is Caucasians.

An example of people is Spanish-speaking.

An example of people is wealthy.

An example of people is vegetarian.

noun
3
2
Persons subordinate to or loyal to a ruler, superior, or employer.

The manager would like to introduce you to our people in the regional office.

noun
1
1
A body of persons sharing a common religion, culture, or language.

The peoples of central Asia.

noun
1
2
Persons with regard to their residence, class, profession, or group.

City people; farming people.

noun
1
2
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The mass of a community as distinguished from a special class (elite); the commonalty; the populace; the vulgar; the common crowd; the citizens.
noun
0
0
To stock with people or inhabitants; to fill as with people; to populate.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To become populous or populated.
verb
0
0
To inhabit; to occupy; to populate.
verb
0
0
Animals or other beings distinct from humans.

Rabbits and squirrels are the furry little people of the woods.

noun
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1
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Humans considered as a group or in indefinite numbers. Often treated as a plural of person, especially in compounds.

People were dancing in the street. I met all sorts of people. This book is not intended for laypeople.

noun
0
1
The mass of ordinary persons; the populace. Used with the .
noun
0
1
A body of persons living in the same country under one national government; a nationality.
noun
0
1
The citizens of a political unit, such as a nation or state; the electorate. Used with the.
noun
0
1
To settle or inhabit with people; populate.
verb
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1
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To be present in or on (a place).
verb
0
1
A group of creatures.

The ant people.

noun
0
1
All the persons of a racial, national, religious, or linguistic group; nation, race, etc.

The peoples of the world.

noun
0
1
A group of persons with common traditional, historical, or cultural ties, as distinct from racial or political unity.

The Jewish people.

noun
0
1
pluralNoun
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1
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The persons belonging to a certain place, community, or class.

The people of Iowa, people of wealth.

pluralNoun
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1
The members of a group under the leadership, influence, or control of a particular person or body, as members of a group of servants, royal subjects, etc.
pluralNoun
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1
The members of (someone's) class, occupation, set, race, tribe, etc.

The miner spoke for his people.

pluralNoun
0
1
One's relatives or ancestors; family.
pluralNoun
0
1
Persons without wealth, influence, privilege, or distinction; members of the populace.
pluralNoun
0
1
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The citizens or electorate of a state.
pluralNoun
0
1
Persons considered indefinitely.

People are funny.

pluralNoun
0
1
Human beings, as distinct from other animals.
pluralNoun
0
1
To fill with or as with people; populate; stock.
verb
0
1
affix
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1
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0
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A group of persons with common historic, linguistic, national, racial, religious, or traditional ties. There are three basic types of people: those who can do math and those who can't.
0
1
Used as plural of person; a body of human beings considered generally or collectively; a group of two or more persons.

Why do so many people commit suicide?

noun
0
1
(plural peoples) Persons forming or belonging to a particular group, such as a nation, class, ethnic group, country, family, etc; folk; community.
noun
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1
A group of persons regarded as being employees, followers, companions or subjects of a ruler.
noun
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1
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One's colleagues or employees.
noun
0
1
A person's ancestors, relatives or family.

My people lived through the Black Plague and the Thirty Years War.

noun
0
1

Origin of people

Originally a singular noun (e.g. The people is hungry, and weary, and thirsty, in the wilderness --2 Samuel 17:29, King James Version), the plural aspect of people is probably due to influence from Middle English lede, leed, a plural since Old English times (compare Old English lÄ“ode (“people, men, persons"), plural of Old English lÄ“od (“man, person")). See also lede, leod.