Public definition

pŭblĭk
Open to the knowledge or judgment of all.

A public scandal.

adjective
11
2
Enrolled in or attending a public school.

Transit passes for public students.

adjective
11
5
Officially representing the community; carried out or funded by the state on behalf of the community. [from 15th c.]
adjective
6
1
The community or the people as a whole.
noun
7
5
Admirers or followers, especially of a famous person.
noun
4
2
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Acting in an official capacity on behalf of the people as a whole.

A public prosecutor.

adjective
3
1
Participated in or attended by the people or community.
adjective
7
6
Of, concerning, or affecting the community or the people.

The public good.

adjective
2
1
A group of people sharing a common interest.

The reading public.

noun
2
1
Of, belonging to, or concerning the people as a whole; of or by the community at large.

The public welfare, a public outcry.

adjective
2
1
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For the use or benefit of all; esp., supported by government funds.

A public park.

adjective
2
1
As regards community, rather than private, affairs.
adjective
3
3
Capitalized in shares of stock that can be traded on the open market.

A public company; took the company public.

adjective
1
1
Known by, or open to the knowledge of, all or most people.

To make information public, a public figure.

adjective
1
1
(finance) Owned by shareholders whose shares can be freely traded, as on an exchange.

A public company.

adjective
1
1
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Public is ordinary people or people within a community.

All of the people in a given location are an example of the public.

noun
0
0
The definition of public is something that is related to, available to or known by people.

Joining the school board is an example of public service.

A celebrity known by everyone is an example of a public figure.

A park that is open to everyone is an example of a public park.

adjective
0
0
Connected with or acting on behalf of the people, community, or government.

Public office.

adjective
0
0
The people as a whole; community at large.
noun
0
0
A specific part of the people; those people considered together because of some common interest or purpose.

The reading public.

noun
0
0
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Able to be seen or known by everyone; open to general view, happening without concealment. [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
0
Pertaining to all the people as a whole (as opposed a private group); concerning the whole country, community etc. [from 15th c.]
adjective
0
0
Open to all members of a community; especially, provided by national or local authorities and supported by money from taxes. [from 15th c.]
adjective
0
0
(of a company) Traded publicly via a stock market.
adjective
0
0
The people in general, regardless of membership of any particular group.

Members of the public may not proceed beyond this point.

noun
0
0
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(archaic) A public house; an inn.

noun
0
0
Maintained for or used by the people or community.

A public park.

adjective
0
1
(informal) go public with
  • To reveal to the public a previously unknown or secret piece of information:
    The president finally had to go public with the scandal.
idiom
1
0
in public
  • In such a way as to be visible to the scrutiny of the people:
idiom
1
0
go public
  • to become a publicly owned company by issuing shares for sale to the public
  • to reveal something previously kept private or secret to the public
idiom
0
0
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in public
  • openly; not in private or in secrecy
idiom
0
1

Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of public - man's room

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
public
Plural:
publics

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of public

  • Middle English publik from Old French public from Latin pūblicus alteration (influenced by pūbēs adult population) of poplicus from populus people of Etruscan origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman publik, public, Middle French public, publique et al., and their source, Latin pÅ«blicus (“pertaining to the people"), alteration (probably after pubes (“adult men")) of populicus, from populus (“people"). Compare people.

    From Wiktionary