Common meaning

kŏm'ən
Having no special designation, status, or rank.

A common sailor.

adjective
6
0
The legal right of a person to use the lands or waters of another, as for fishing.
noun
5
0
Widely existing; general; prevalent.

Common knowledge.

adjective
4
0
The definition of common is something that belongs to or is shared by two or more people or the community at large.

An example of common is the knowledge of drivers to stop at a red light.

adjective
3
0
Found in large numbers or in a large quantity.

Sharks are common in these waters.

adjective
3
0
Advertisement
adjective
3
0
Vernacular, referring to the name of a kind of plant or animal, i.e., common name vs. scientific name.
adjective
3
0
Mutual good, shared by more than one.
noun
3
0
Belonging equally to, or shared by, two or more or by all.

The common interests of a group.

adjective
2
0
Belonging or relating to the community at large; public.

Common carriers.

adjective
2
0
Advertisement
Having no rank.

A common soldier.

adjective
2
0
Below ordinary; inferior.

Common ware.

adjective
2
0
Not refined; vulgar; low; coarse.
adjective
2
0
Formed of or dividing into branches.
adjective
2
0
Belonging equally to two or more quantities.

A common denominator.

adjective
2
0
Advertisement
Land owned or used by all the inhabitants of a place; tract of open public land, esp. as a park in a city or town.
noun
2
0
Mutual; shared by more than one.

The two competitors have the common aim of winning the championship. Winning the championship is an aim common to the two competitors.

adjective
2
0
(grammar) In some languages, particularly Germanic languages, of the gender originating from the coalescence of the masculine and feminine categories of nouns.
adjective
2
0
Of or pertaining to uncapitalized nouns in English, i.e., common nouns vs. proper nouns.
adjective
2
0
A tract of land in common ownership; common land.
noun
2
0
Advertisement
The people; the community.
noun
2
0
Grafton.

Embassadors were sent upon both parts, and divers means of entreaty were commoned of.

verb
2
0
The common people; commonalty.
noun
2
1
A tract of land, usually in a centrally located spot, belonging to or used by a community as a whole.

A band concert on the village common.

noun
2
1
A building or hall for dining, typically at a university or college.
noun
2
1
Advertisement
Common stock.
noun
2
1
A service used for a particular class of festivals.
noun
2
1
(law) The right of taking a profit in the land of another, in common either with the owner or with other persons; so called from the community of interest which arises between the claimant of the right and the owner of the soil, or between the claimants and other commoners entitled to the same right.
noun
2
1
Widespread; prevalent.

Gas stations became common as the use of cars grew.

adjective
1
0

It is common to find sharks off this coast.

adjective
1
0
Advertisement
Unrefined or coarse in manner; vulgar.

Behavior that branded him as common.

adjective
0
1
The House of Commons.
noun
0
1
Widely but unfavorably known.

A common criminal.

adjective
0
1
Not of the upper classes; of the masses.

The common man.

adjective
0
1
The right that a person has, in common with the owner or others, in the land or waters of another.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
in common
  • Equally with or by all.
idiom
0
0
in common
  • Equally with, or shared by, another or all concerned.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of common

  • Middle English commune from Old French commun from Latin commūnis mei-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English comun, from Anglo-Norman comun, from Old French comun (rare in the Gallo-Romance languages, but reinforced as a Carolingian calque of Frankish gemeini, gamaini "common" in Old French), from Latin commūnis (“common, public, general”), from Proto-Indo-European *ko-moin-i (“held in common”). Displaced native Middle English ȝemǣne, imene (“common, general, universal”) (from Old English ġemǣne (“common, universal”)), Middle English mǣne, mene (“mean, common”) (also from Old English ġemǣne (“common, universal”)), Middle English samen, somen (“in common, together”) (from Old English samen (“together”)).
    From Wiktionary