Tusk meaning

tŭsk
An elongated pointed tooth, usually one of a pair, extending outside of the mouth in certain animals such as the walrus, elephant, or wild boar.
noun
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One of a pair of elongated pointed teeth that extend outside the mouth of an animal such as walrus, elephant or wild boar.

Until the CITES sales ban, elephant tusks were the 'backbone' of the legal ivory trade.

noun
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A small projection on a (tusk) tenon.
noun
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A tusk shell.
noun
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(carpentry) A projecting member like a tenon, and serving the same or a similar purpose, but composed of several steps, or offsets, called teeth.
noun
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To dig up using a tusk, as boars do.
verb
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A fish, the torsk.
noun
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
noun
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A long projecting tooth or toothlike part.
noun
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To gore or dig with the tusks or a tusk.
verb
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In elephants, wild boars, walruses, etc., a very long, large, pointed tooth, usually one of a pair, projecting outside the mouth and used for defense, digging up food, etc.
noun
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Any tooth or projection suggestive of a tusk.
noun
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To dig, gore, etc. with a tusk or tusks.
verb
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A long, pointed tooth, usually one of a pair, projecting from the mouth of certain animals, such as elephants, walruses, and wild pigs. Tusks are used for procuring food and as weapons.
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Origin of tusk

  • Of North Germanic origin dialectal Norwegian tosk Faroese toskur cod both from Old Norse thorskr ters- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English tux, tusce from Old English tūx, tūsc canine tooth dent- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English tusk (also tux, tusch), from Old English tÅ«x, tÅ«sc (“grinder, canine tooth, tusk"), from Proto-Germanic *tunþskaz (“tooth"), extended form of Proto-Germanic *tanþs (“tooth"), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dónts (“tooth"). Cognate with West Frisian tosk (“tooth"), Icelandic toskur (“a tusk, tooth") (whence the Old Norse and Icelandic Ratatoskr and Ratatoskur respectively), Gothic [script?] (tunþus, “tooth") and [script?] (tundi, “thorn, tooth"). More at tooth.
    From Wiktionary