Gore meaning

gôr
The definition of gore is violence and bloodshed.

A movie that has a lot of violence and bloodshed is an example of a movie that has a lot of gore.

noun
2
1
To gore is defined as the action of an animal stabbing someone or another animal with a horn.

When a bull stabs a person with his horn, this is an example of a situation where the bull gores a person.

verb
2
1
To pierce or stab with a horn or tusk.
verb
2
1
A small triangular piece of land.
noun
2
2
A triangular or tapering piece of cloth forming a part of something, as in a skirt or sail.
noun
1
2
Advertisement
To provide with a gore.
verb
0
1
To cut into a gore.
verb
0
1
Blood, especially coagulated blood from a wound.
noun
0
1
Blood shed from a wound, esp. when clotted.
noun
0
1
To pierce with or as with a horn or tusk.
verb
0
1
Advertisement
A small, triangular piece of land as where two roads diverge.
noun
0
1
A tapering piece of cloth made or inserted in a skirt, sail, etc. to give it fullness.
noun
0
1
To make or insert a gore or gores in.
verb
0
1
1948- ; vice president of the U.S. (1993-2001)
proper name
0
1
Blood, especially that from a wound when thickened due to exposure to the air.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
noun
0
1
(of an animal) To pierce with the horns.

The bull gored the matador.

verb
0
1
A triangular piece of land where roads meet.

noun
0
1
A triangular or rhomboid piece of fabric, especially one forming part of a three-dimensional surface such as a sail, skirt, hot-air balloon, etc.
noun
0
1
An elastic gusset for providing a snug fit in a shoe.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
A projecting point.
noun
0
1
(heraldry) One of the abatements, made of two curved lines, meeting in an acute angle in the fesse point.
noun
0
1
To cut in a triangular form.
verb
0
1
To provide with a gore.

To gore an apron.

verb
0
1

Origin of gore

  • Middle English goren probably from gore spear from Old English gār

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English gāra triangular piece of land

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English filth from Old English gor

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from gore (“a projecting point”), or ultimately from Old English gār (“spear”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English gāra.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English gor.

    From Wiktionary