Elastic meaning

ĭ-lăstĭk
Quick to recover, as from disappointment; resilient.

An elastic spirit.

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Capable of being adapted to change or a variety of circumstances.
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(economics) Of, relating to, or being a good for which changes in price have a large effect on the quantity demanded or supplied.
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A rubber band.
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Able to spring back to its original size, shape, or position after being stretched, squeezed, flexed, expanded, etc.; flexible; springy.
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Able to recover easily from dejection, fatigue, etc.; buoyant.

An elastic temperament.

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Readily changed or changing to suit circumstances; adaptable.

Elastic regulations.

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(econ.) Responding to changes in price.
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An elastic fabric made flexible by strands of rubber or a rubberlike synthetic running through it.
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A band, garter, etc. of this material.
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A rubber band.
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Capable of stretching; particularly, capable of stretching so as to return to an original shape or size when force is released.

The rope is somewhat elastic, so expect it to give when you pull on it.

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Made of elastic.

Elastic band.

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Of clothing, elasticated.
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(economics) Sensitive to changes in price.

Demand for entertainment is more elastic than demand for energy.

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Able to return quickly to a former state or condition, after being depressed or overtaxed; having power to recover easily from shocks and trials.

Elastic spirits; an elastic constitution.

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(uncountable) An elastic material used in clothing, particularly in waistbands and cuffs.

Running shorts use elastic to eliminate the need for a belt.

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(countable) An elastic band.
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Origin of elastic

  • New Latin elasticus from Late Greek elastos beaten, ductile variant of Greek elatos from elaunein to beat out

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French élastique, from New Latin elasticus (“elastic”), from Ancient Greek as if * ἐλαστής (elastēs) for ἐλατής (elatēs), equiv. to ἐλατήρ (elatēr, “a driver, hurler”), from ἐλαύνειν (elaunein, “to drive, set in motion, push, strike, beat out”).

    From Wiktionary