Fang meaning

făng
Frequency:
Any of the canine teeth of a carnivorous animal, such as a dog or wolf, with which it seizes and tears its prey.
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A member of a people inhabiting Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, and Cameroon.
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The Bantu language of the Fang.
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The pointed part of something.
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Any of the hollow or grooved teeth of a venomous snake with which it injects its poison.
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A member of an African people living in N Gabon, S Cameroon, and Equatorial Guinea.
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The Bantu language of this people.
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Any of the hollow or grooved teeth of a venomous snake with which it injects venom.
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A long, sharp, pointed tooth, especially a canine tooth of a carnivorous animal, such as a dog or wolf, with which it seizes and tears its prey.
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The root of a tooth or a pronglike division of such a root.
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A fanglike structure, especially a chelicera of a venomous spider.
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A long, pointed tooth in vertebrate animals or a similar structure in spiders, used to seize prey and sometimes to inject venom. The fangs of a poisonous snake, for example, have a hollow groove through which venom flows.
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(dialectal or archaic) To catch, capture; seize; grip; clutch; lay hold of.

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(dialectal) To receive or adopt into spiritual relation, as in baptism; be godfather or godmother to.
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(Now chiefly dialetal, Scotland) A grasping; capture; the act or power of seizing; hold.
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That which is seized or carried off; booty; spoils; stolen goods.
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Any projection, catch, shoot, or other thing by which hold is taken; a prehensile part or organ.
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(mining) A channel cut in the rock, or a pipe of wood, used for conveying air.
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(rare, in the plural) Cage-shuts.
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(dialectal) The coil or bend of a rope; (by extension) a noose; a trap.
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A long, pointed canine tooth used for biting and tearing flesh.
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(in snakes) A long pointed tooth for injecting venom.
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(rare) To strike or attack with the fangs.
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To enable to catch or tear; to furnish with fangs.
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(collective) A people of western Africa.
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The Bantu language of these people, also called Pahouin.
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A second, only distantly related language of Africa.
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A long, sharp, pointed tooth, especially a canine tooth.
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The root of a tooth or a pronglike division of such a root.
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A fanglike structure, especially a chelicera of a venomous spider.
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Origin of fang

  • Middle English booty, spoils, something seized from Old English pag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fang, feng (“a catching, capture, seizing”), from Old English fang, feng (“grip, embrace, grasp, grasping, capture, prey, booty, plunder”), from Proto-Germanic *fangą, *fangiz, *fanhiz (“catch, catching, seizure”), from *fanhaną (“to catch, capture”), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ǵ- (“to fasten”). Cognate with Scots fang (“that which is taken, capture, catch, prey, booty”), Dutch vang (“a catch”), Low German fangst (“a catch”), German Fang (“a catch, capture, booty”), Swedish fång, fångst, Icelandic fang. Related also to Latin pangere (“to solidify, drive in”), Albanian mpij (“to benumb, stiffen”), Ancient Greek πήγνυμι (pḗgnumi, “to stiffen, firm up”), Sanskrit पाशयति (pāśáyati, “(s)he binds”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English fangen, from Old English fōn (“to take, grasp, seize, catch, capture, make prisoner, receive, accept, assume, undertake, meet with, encounter”), and Old Norse fanga (“to fetch, capture”), both from Proto-Germanic *fanhaną, *fangōną (“to catch, capture”), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ḱ- (“to fasten, place”). Cognate with West Frisian fange (“to catch”), Dutch vangen (“to catch”), German fangen (“to catch”), Danish fange (“to catch”), Albanian peng (“to hinder, hold captive”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From an abbreviation of fangtooth, from Middle English *fangtooth, *fengtooth, from Old English fængtōþ, fengtōþ (“canine tooth”, literally “catch-tooth”). Cognate with German Fangzahn (“fang”, literally “catch-tooth”) and Dutch vangtand.

    From Wiktionary