Grip meaning

grĭp
A suitcase or valise.
noun
4
0
To secure and maintain a tight hold on; seize firmly.
verb
2
0
To hold the interest or attention of.

A scene that gripped the entire audience.

verb
1
0
To maintain a secure grasp.
verb
1
0
The act of taking firmly and holding fast with the hand, teeth, an instrument, etc.; secure grasp; firm hold.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To do something with another that makes you happy/gives you relief.

Let’s grip (get a coffee, hang, take a break, see a movie, etc.)

verb
1
0
A channel cut through a grass verge (especially for the purpose of draining water away from the highway).
noun
1
0
A device for grasping or holding fast to something.
noun
1
0
The manner in which this is done.
noun
0
0
Any special manner of clasping hands by which members of a secret or fraternal society identify one another as such.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The power of grasping firmly.

To lose one's grip on a slippery handle.

noun
0
0
The power of understanding; mental grasp.

To have a good grip on a matter.

noun
0
0
Firm control; mastery.

In the grip of disease, to get a grip on oneself.

noun
0
0
A mechanical contrivance for clutching or grasping.
noun
0
0
A part by which something is grasped; often, specif., a handle or hilt.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A small bag or satchel for holding clothes, etc. in traveling.
noun
0
0
One who handles properties and scenery on a stage or TV or film set.
noun
0
0
The manner of holding a ball, bat, club, racket, etc.
noun
0
0
To take firmly and hold fast with the hand, teeth, an instrument, etc.
verb
0
0
To give a grip to.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To fasten or join firmly (to)
verb
0
0
To get a grip.
verb
0
0
noun
0
0
(Globally Resilient IP) Features built into Cisco's IOS router operating system in 2002 that eliminate packet loss during a router switchover. Such features include Stateful Switchover, which transfers the state of the original router to the standby router, while Nonstop Forwarding maintains packet flow during the switchover.
0
0
To take hold of, particularly with the hand.

That suitcase is heavy, so grip the handle firmly.

The glue will begin to grip within five minutes.

After a few slips, the tires gripped the pavement.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To help or assist, particularly in an emotional sense.

He grips me.

verb
0
0
To trench; to drain.
verb
0
0
A hold or way of holding, particularly with the hand.

It's good to have a firm grip when shaking hands.

The ball will move differently depending on the grip used when throwing it.

noun
0
0
A handle or other place to grip.

The grip of a sword.

There are several good grips on the northern face of this rock.

noun
0
0
(film production) A person responsible for handling equipment on the set.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(chiefly Southern California slang) A lot of something.

That is a grip of cheese.

noun
0
0
Archaic spelling of grippe: Influenza, flu.

She has the grip.

noun
0
0
(archaic) A small travelling-bag.
noun
0
0

He gave me a grip.

noun
0
0

You're a real grip.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(slang) As much as one can hold in a hand; a handful.

I need to get a grip of nails for my project.

noun
0
0
(figuratively) A tenacious grasp; a holding fast.

In the grip of a blackmailer.

noun
0
0
(dialectal) A small ditch or trench; a channel to carry off water or other liquid; a drain.

noun
0
0
(obsolete) The griffin.
noun
0
0
To grip is defined as to take or hold something firmly.

An example of to grip is holding onto the handle bars of a bike.

An example of to grip is to have a solid idea of right and wrong.

verb
0
1
Advertisement
come to grips
  • To engage in hand-to-hand fighting.
  • To struggle or try to cope (with).
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of grip

  • Middle English from Old English gripe grasp gripa handful
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English grip, grippe, gryppe (“a ditch, drain”), from Old English grēp (“a furrow, burrow”) and Old English grēpe (“a furrow, ditch, drain”), from Proto-Germanic *grōpiz (“a furrow, groove”). Cognate with Middle Dutch grippe, gruppe (“ditch, drain”), greppe, German Low German Gruppe (“ditch, drain”). Related also to Old English grōp (“a ditch, drain”). More at groop.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old English grippan, from a Proto-Germanic *gripjaną (compare Old High German gripfen); cf. the related Old English grīpan, whence English gripe. See also grope.
    From Wiktionary
  • An amalgam of Old English gripe (“grasp, hold”) (cognate with German Griff) and Old English gripa (“handful”) (cognate with Swedish grepp).
    From Wiktionary
  • Latin grypus, gryphus.
    From Wiktionary