Grasp meaning

grăsp
To hold with the arms; embrace.
verb
5
1
Grasp is defined as to have a firm hold on something.

An example of grasp is to tightly hold a rail.

An example of grasp is to fully understand a scientific concept.

verb
5
3
To take hold of intellectually; comprehend.
verb
3
1
The act of grasping.
noun
3
1
To take hold of or seize firmly with the hand, the foot, another body part, or an instrument.

The elephant grasped the branch with its trunk.

verb
3
2
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To show eager and prompt willingness or acceptance.

Grasps at any opportunity.

verb
2
1
The definition of grasp is a firm hold on something.

An example of grasp is a strong hold onto a banister.

noun
1
0
Understanding; comprehension.
noun
1
0
The act of grasping; grip or clasp of the hand or arms.
noun
1
0
To make a motion of seizing, snatching, or clutching.
verb
0
0
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The ability or power to seize or attain; reach.

Victory in the election was within her grasp.

noun
0
0
To take hold of firmly with or as with the hand or arms; grip.
verb
0
0
To take hold of eagerly or greedily; seize.
verb
0
0
To take hold of mentally; understand; comprehend.
verb
0
0
To reach for and try to seize.
verb
0
0
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To accept eagerly.
verb
0
0
A firm hold; control; possession.
noun
0
0
The power to hold or seize; reach.
noun
0
0
Power of understanding; comprehension.
noun
0
0
To grip; to take hold, particularly with the hand.
verb
0
0
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​To understand.

I have never been able to grasp the concept of infinity.

verb
0
0
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
That which is accessible; that which is within one's reach or ability.

The goal is within my grasp.

noun
0
0
(software, object-oriented design) Acronym of General Responsibility Assignment Software Patterns (Principles).
acronym
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0
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grasp
  • To search in desperation for a solution to a difficulty.
idiom
0
0
grasp the nettle
  • To take on a difficult problem directly and energetically.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of grasp

  • Middle English graspen ghrebh-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Originally "to feel around", possibly metathesis of Old English græpsan "to touch, feel," from Proto-Germanic *graipison.

    From Wiktionary