Dig definition

dĭg
To force down and into something; thrust.

Dug his foot in the ground.

verb
7
1
(chiefly brit., informal) Living quarters; lodgings.
noun
5
1
(sports) To strike or redirect (a ball) just before it hits the ground, keeping it in play, as in tennis or volleyball.
verb
6
4
A sarcastic, taunting remark; a gibe.
noun
2
0
The definition of a dig is a sarcastic remark or joke, or an archaeological search.

An example of a dig is a teasing comment made at someone.

An example of a dig is a search for dinosaur bones in the ground.

noun
1
0
Advertisement
A poke or thrust.

A sharp dig in the ribs.

noun
1
1
To dig is defined as to break up, remove or unearth, or to discover or find.

An example of to dig is to move dirt with a shovel.

An example of to dig is to find evidence for a new theory.

verb
0
0
To break up, turn over, or remove (earth or sand, for example), as with a shovel, spade, or snout, or with claws, paws or hands.
verb
0
0
To poke or prod.

Dug me in the ribs.

verb
0
0
To make or form by removing earth or other material.

Dig a trench; dug my way out of the snow.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To prepare (soil) by loosening or cultivating.
verb
0
0
To obtain or unearth by digging.

Dig coal out of a seam; dug potatoes from a field.

verb
0
0
To obtain or find by an action similar to digging.

Dug a dollar out of his pocket; dug the puck out of the corner.

verb
0
0
To understand fully.

Do you dig what I mean?

verb
0
0
To like, enjoy, or appreciate.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To take notice of.

Dig that wild outfit.

verb
0
0
To make one's way by or as if by pushing aside or removing material.

Dug through the files.

verb
0
0
(slang) To have understanding.

Do you dig?

verb
0
0
An archaeological excavation.
noun
0
0
(sports) An act or an instance of digging a ball.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Lodgings.
noun
0
0
To break and turn up or remove (ground, etc.) with a spade or other tool, or with hands, claws, snout, etc.
verb
0
0
To make (a hole, cellar, one's way, etc.) by or as by doing this.
verb
0
0
To uncover and get from the ground or another surface in this way.

To dig potatoes, to dig a nail out of a board.

verb
0
0
To find out, as by careful study or investigation; unearth.

To dig out the truth.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To thrust, jab, or prod.

To dig an elbow into someone's ribs.

verb
0
0
To understand.
verb
0
0
To approve of or like.
verb
0
0
To notice; look at.

Dig that shirt!

verb
0
0
To dig the ground or any surface.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To make a way by or as by digging (through, into, under)
verb
0
0
(informal) To work or study hard.
verb
0
0
The act of digging.
noun
0
0
(informal) A thrust, poke, nudge, etc.
noun
0
0
(informal) A sarcastic comment; taunt; gibe.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
An archaeological excavation or its site.
noun
0
0
Digest.
abbreviation
0
0
(astronomy) Dwarf irregular galaxy.
acronym
0
0
To learn or discover by careful research or investigation.

Dug up the evidence; dug out the real facts.

verb
0
1
To loosen, turn over, or remove earth or other material.
verb
0
1
Advertisement
dig in (one's) heels
  • To resist opposition stubbornly; refuse to yield or compromise.
idiom
0
0
dig it out
  • To run as fast as one can, especially as a base runner in baseball.
idiom
0
0
dig in
  • to dig trenches or foxholes for cover
  • to entrench oneself
idiom
0
0
dig in one's heels
  • to refuse to give up or modify one's opinion, policy, attitude, etc., esp. when faced with opposition
idiom
0
0
dig into
  • to penetrate by or as by digging
  • to work hard at
idiom
0
0
Advertisement

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
dig
Plural:
digs

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of dig

  • Middle English diggen perhaps akin to Old French digue dike, trench dhīgw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition