Trench definition

trĕnch
A long narrow ditch embanked with its own soil and used for concealment and protection in warfare.
noun
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A deep furrow or ditch.
noun
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A long, steep-sided valley on the ocean floor.
noun
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To dig a trench or trenches.
verb
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To verge or border. Often used with on or upon .
verb
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To verge or border (on); come close.
verb
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A long, narrow ditch dug by soldiers for cover and concealment, with the removed earth heaped up in front.
noun
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To cut, cut into, cut off, etc.; slice, gash, etc.
verb
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To infringe (on or upon another's land, rights, time, etc.)
verb
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A long, steep-sided valley on the ocean floor. Trenches form when one tectonic plate slides beneath another plate at a subduction zone. The Marianas Trench, located in the western Pacific east of the Philippines, is the deepest known trench (10,924 m or 35,831 ft) and the deepest area in the ocean.
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The definition of a trench is a long, narrow ditch sometimes dug by troops during wartime to hide from enemies.

A long narrow ditch dug in World War I to protect troops from being seen by the enemy is an example of a trench.

noun
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Trench means to dig a long and narrow ditch.

When you dig a long, narrow ditch to place a pipe, this is an example of a time when you trench.

verb
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To surround or fortify with trenches; entrench.
verb
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To cut a deep furrow or furrows in.
verb
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To dig a ditch or ditches in.
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A long, narrow ditch or hole dug in the ground.
noun
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(military) A narrow excavation as used in warfare, as a cover for besieging or emplaced forces.
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(archaeology) A pit, usually rectangular with smooth walls and floor, excavated during an archaeological investigation.
noun
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(informal) A trench coat.
noun
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(usually followed by upon) To invade, especially with regard to the rights or the exclusive authority of another; to encroach.
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(military, infantry) To excavate an elongated pit for protection of soldiers and or equipment, usually perpendicular to the line of sight toward the enemy.

verb
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(archaeology) To excavate an elongated and often narrow pit.
verb
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To have direction; to aim or tend.

verb
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To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, etc.
verb
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To cut furrows or ditches in.

To trench land for the purpose of draining it.

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To dig or cultivate very deeply, usually by digging parallel contiguous trenches in succession, filling each from the next.

To trench a garden for certain crops.

verb
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To dig or make a trench or trenches in (land or an area, for example).
verb
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To place in a trench.

Trench a pipeline.

verb
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To encroach. Often used with on or upon .
verb
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To dig a ditch or ditches, as for fortification.
verb
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A deep furrow in the ground, ocean floor, etc.
noun
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the trenches
  • a system of trenches dug as fortifications, as in WWI
  • a situation characterized by the heavy or physical work of any struggle or enterprise
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
trench
Plural:
trenches

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the trenches

Origin of trench

  • Middle English trenche from Old French from trenchier to cut perhaps from Vulgar Latin trincāre variant of Latin truncāre from truncus trunk terə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French trenche.

    From Wiktionary