Pit meaning

pĭt
The definition of a pit is a hole in the ground, or the hard stone in a fruit that contains the seed.

An example of a pit is a deep hole in the mud.

An example of a pit is the hard core of a peach.

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An abyss.
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A hole or cavity in the ground.
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Hell.
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A concealed hole in the ground used as a trap; a pitfall.
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The middle areas of the defensive and offensive lines.
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To mark with cavities, depressions, or scars.

A surface pitted with craters.

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To place, bury, or store in a pit.
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To become marked with pits.
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To retain an impression after being indented. Used of the skin.
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To stop at a refueling area during an auto race.
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The single central kernel or stone of certain fruits, such as a peach or cherry.
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To extract the pit from (a fruit).
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The hard stone, as of the plum, peach, or cherry, which contains the seed.
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To remove the pit from (a fruit)
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A covered hole used to trap wild animals; pitfall.
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Any concealed danger; trap; snare.
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An enclosed area in which animals are kept or made to fight.

A bear pit.

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A hollow or depression on a part of the human body.

Armpit.

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A small hollow in a surface; specif., a depressed scar on the skin, as that resulting from smallpox.
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An area below floor level or ground level.
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The section, often below floor level, in front of the stage, where the orchestra sits.
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The part of the floor of an exchange where a special branch of business is transacted.

Corn pit.

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In a casino, an area in which gambling tables are set up, specif., the area within a ring of such tables.
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A tiny depression in a plant cell wall.
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To put, cast, or store in a pit.
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To make pits in.
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To mark with small scars.

Pitted by smallpox.

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To set (cocks, etc.) in a pit to fight.
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To set in competition (against)
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To become marked with pits.
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To make a pit stop during an auto race.
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A natural hollow or depression in the body or an organ.
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A small indented scar left in the skin by smallpox or other eruptive disease; a pockmark.
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A sharp-pointed depression in the enamel surface of a tooth, caused by faulty or incomplete calcification or formed by the confluent point of two or more lobes of enamel.
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To mark with cavities, depressions, or scars.
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To retain an impression after being indented. Used of the skin.
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The hard, inner layer (the endocarp) of certain drupes that are valued for their flesh, such as peaches, cherries, or olives. Not in scientific use.
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An indentation in an optical medium such as a CD-ROM or DVD. The laser beam is either absorbed in the pit or reflects off the non-indented areas, which are called "lands." Using various algorithms, the reflections are converted into 0 and 1 bits.
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The location of trading activity on futures or options exchanges that use open-outcry trading, a system in which traders shout out the prices they are willing to buy or sell contracts at. Around the pits are ascending steps, called rings, where support staff for traders stand.
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A hole in the ground.
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(motor racing) An area at a motor racetrack used for refueling and repairing the vehicles during a race.
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(music) A section of the marching band containing mallet percussion instruments and other large percussion instruments too large to march, such as the tam tam. Also, the area on the sidelines where these instruments are placed.
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A mine.
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(archaeology) A hole or trench in the ground, excavated according to grid coordinates, so that the provenance of any feature observed and any specimen or artifact revealed may be established by precise measurement.
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(trading) A trading pit.
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(in the plural, with the, idiomatic, slang) Something particularly unpleasant.

His circus job was the pits, but at least he was in show business.

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The bottom part of.

I felt pain in the pit of my stomach.

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(colloquial) Armpit, oxter.
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(aviation) A luggage hold.
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(countable) A small surface hole or depression, a fossa.
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The indented mark left by a pustule, as in smallpox.
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The grave, or underworld.
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An enclosed area into which gamecocks, dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where dogs are trained to kill rats.
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Formerly, that part of a theatre, on the floor of the house, below the level of the stage and behind the orchestra; now, in England, commonly the part behind the stalls; in the United States, the parquet; also, the occupants of such a part of a theatre.
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Part of a casino which typically holds tables for blackjack, craps, roulette, and other games.
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To make pits in.

Exposure to acid rain pitted the metal.

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To put (a dog) into a pit for fighting.
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To bring (something) into opposition with something else.

Are you ready to pit your wits against one of the world's greatest puzzles?

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(intransitive, motor racing) To return to the pits during a race for refuelling, tyre changes, repairs etc.
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A seed inside a fruit; a stone or pip inside a fruit.
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A shell in a drupe containing a seed.
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To remove the stone from a stone fruit or the shell from a drupe.

One must pit a peach to make it ready for a pie.

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Precision Immobilization Technique.
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Pursuit Intervention Technique.
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Parallel Immobilization Technique.

All three terms mean the same thing, a bumping technique used by U.S. police departments during car pursuits to force the pursued vehicle to abruptly turn sideways to the direction of travel, causing the driver to lose control and stop. Usually used in the phrase "PIT maneuver".

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(computing) Programmable interval timer.
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To pit is defined as to set in competition against someone or something.

An example of to pit is to turn someone against her best friend.

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A natural or artificial hole or cavity in the ground.
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A small indentation in a surface.

Pits in a windshield.

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An enclosed, usually sunken area in which animals, such as dogs or gamecocks, are placed for fighting.
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To set in direct opposition or competition.

A war that pitted brother against brother.

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the pits
  • The worst possible thing, place, condition, etc.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of pit

  • Middle English from Old English pytt ultimately from Latin puteus well pau-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Dutch from Middle Dutch
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old English pytt (“pit, hole in the ground, well, grave, pustule, pockmark"), from Proto-Germanic *putjaz (“pit, well"), from Latin puteus (“trench, pit, well"), from Proto-Indo-European *pewǝ- (“to beat, hew"). Cognate with West Frisian pet (“pit"), Eastern Frisian put (“pit"), Dutch put (“well, pockmark"), German Pfütze (“puddle, pool"), Danish pyt (“pit"), Icelandic pytt (“pit").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Dutch pit (“kernel, core"), from Middle Dutch pitte, from Proto-Germanic *pittan (compare Middle Franconian Pfitze (“pimple")), oblique of *piþō. Compare pith.
    From Wiktionary