Hell meaning

hĕl
Frequency:
The place where the spirits of the dead are.
noun
7
1
Any place or condition of evil, pain, disorder, cruelty, etc.
noun
6
1
A state or place of woe and anguish, arrived at by the wicked or unrepentant after death.
noun
3
2
Used to express anger, disgust, or impatience.
interjection
3
3
In various religions, the place where some or all spirits are believed to go after death.

Do Muslims believe that all non-Muslims go to hell?

pronoun
2
0
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The definition of hell is something or somewhere that is horrible, a state of great pain and suffering or a place of great suffering where sinners go.

When you experience a time of great sadness, misery, suffering and misfortune, this is an example of a time when you are said to be in hell.

When you go to a miserable, unpleasant place to be, this is an example of a time when you might say you are in hell.

An example of hell is the place where you go in the Christian religion if you are an unrepentant sinner.

noun
1
1
Used to express irritation, anger, etc.
interjection
1
3
To live or act in a reckless or dissolute way.
verb
1
4
The abode of the dead in any of various religious traditions, such as the Hebrew Sheol or the Greek Hades; the underworld.
noun
0
1
A sharp scolding.

Gave the student hell for cheating.

noun
0
1
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A gambling house.
noun
0
1
To behave riotously; carouse.

Out all night helling around.

verb
0
1
(Abrahamic religions, uncountable) The place where devils live and where sinners are tortured after death.

May you rot in hell!

pronoun
0
1
(countable, hyperbolic) A place or situation of great suffering in life.

My new boss is making my job a hell.

I went through hell to get home today.

noun
0
1
(countable) A place for gambling.
noun
0
1
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An extremely hot place.

You don't have a snowball's chance in hell.

noun
0
1
Used as an intensifier in phrases grammatically requiring a noun.

I'm as mad as hell and I'm not going to take it any more.

What the hell is wrong with you?

He says he's going home early? Like hell he is.

noun
0
1
In certain games of chase, a place to which those who are caught are carried for detention.
noun
0
1
(not polite) Used to express negative discontent.

Oh, hell! I got another parking ticket.

interjection
0
1
(not polite) Used to emphasize.

Hell, yeah!

interjection
0
1
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for the hell of it
  • For no particular reason; on a whim:.
    Walked home by the old school for the hell of it.
idiom
0
0
hell on
  • Damaging or destructive to:.
    Driving in a hilly town is hell on the brakes.
  • Unpleasant to or painful for.
idiom
0
0
hell or
  • Troubles or difficulties of whatever magnitude:.
    We're staying, come hell or high water.
idiom
0
0
hell to pay
  • Great trouble:.
    If we're wrong, there'll be hell to pay.
idiom
0
0
like hell
  • Used as an intensive:.
    He ran like hell to catch the bus.
  • Used to express strong contradiction or refusal:.
    He says he's going along with us—Like hell he is!.
idiom
0
0
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to hell and gone
  • A long distance away:.
    Drove to hell and gone and still couldn't find a diner.
  • Far and wide:.
    Friends scattered to hell and gone.
  • Into the next world:.
    The bomb blew the truck to hell and gone.
idiom
0
0
to hell with
  • Used to express contempt for or dismissal of someone or something.
idiom
0
0
a hell of a
  • Very much a.
    a hell of a good ale.
  • Extraordinary, outrageous, terrible, etc.
    A hell of a thing to say to one's grandparent.
idiom
0
0
as hell
  • As can be; to the highest degree; extremely.
idiom
1
0
be hell on
  • To be very difficult or painful for.
  • To be very strict or severe with.
  • To be very destructive or damaging to.
idiom
0
0
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catch hell
  • To receive a severe scolding, punishment, etc.
idiom
0
0
for the hell of it
  • For no serious reason or purpose.
idiom
0
0
give someone hell
  • To scold, punish, etc. someone severely.
idiom
0
0
hell to pay
  • Terrible results or severe penalties.
idiom
0
0
like hell
  • Very bad; awful.
  • Very much.
  • Very fast; quickly.
idiom
0
0
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to hell with
  • An exclamation indicating exasperation or anger over (something).
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of hell

  • Middle English helle from Old English kel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English helle, from Old English hel, hell, helle (“nether world, abode of the dead, hell”), from Proto-Germanic *haljō (“nether world, concealed place”), from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (“to cover, conceal, save”). Cognate Dutch hel (“hell”), German Hölle (“hell”), Swedish helvete (“hell”), Icelandic hel (“the abode of the dead, death”). Also related to the Hel of Germanic mythology. See also hele.

    From Wiktionary