Death meaning

dĕth
Frequency:
The termination or extinction of something.

The death of imperialism.

noun
7
2
Death is defined as the act of passing away, the end of life, or the permanent destruction of something.

An example of death is when a person takes his last breath and dies.

An example of death is when a person is no longer alive.

An example of death is when a program loses all its funding and ends forever.

noun
6
2
The state of being dead.
noun
6
3
The personification of death, often a skeleton with a scythe, and one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse.

Death can be seen on a tarot card.

pronoun
6
4
The state of being dead.
noun
5
1
Advertisement
A manner of dying.

A heroine's death.

noun
3
0
Any ending resembling dying; total destruction.

The death of our hopes.

noun
3
0
Civil death.
noun
2
0
The act of dying; termination of life.
noun
2
1
The act or fact of dying; permanent ending of all life in a person, animal, or plant.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
The personification of death, usually pictured as a skeleton in a black robe, holding a scythe.
noun
0
0
Murder or bloodshed.
noun
0
0
Pestilence.

The Black Death.

noun
0
0
The end of life; the permanent cessation of vital bodily functions, as manifested in humans by the loss of heartbeat, the absence of spontaneous breathing, and brain death.
noun
0
0
The end of life of an organism or cell. In humans and animals, death is manifested by the permanent cessation of vital organic functions, including the absence of heartbeat, spontaneous breathing, and brain activity. Cells die as a result of external injury or by an orderly, programmed series of self-destructive events known as apoptosis . The most common causes of death for humans in well-developed countries are cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, certain chronic diseases such as diabetes and emphysema, lung infections, and accidents.
0
0
Advertisement
The cause of dying.

Drugs were the death of him.

noun
0
1
A personification of the destroyer of life, usually represented as a skeleton holding a scythe.
noun
0
1
Any condition or experience thought of as like dying or being dead.
noun
0
1
The cause of death.

Smoking will be the death of him.

noun
0
1
The end of life, when physical functions and vital signs stop.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
An irreversible end to the functioning of the brain. Often used as the legal definition of death.
0
1
The cessation of life and all associated processes; the end of an organism's existence as an entity independent from its environment and its return to an inert, nonliving state.

The death of my grandmother saddened the whole family.

noun
0
1
(often capitalized) The personification of death as a hooded figure with a scythe; the Grim Reaper.

When death walked in, a chill spread through the room.

noun
0
1
(the death) The collapse or end of something.

England scored a goal at the death to even the score at one all.

noun
0
1
at death's door
  • Near to death; gravely ill or injured.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
be the death of
  • To distress or irritate to an intolerable degree.
idiom
0
0
death on
  • Opposed to or strict about:.
    Our boss is death on casual dressing.
idiom
1
0
put to death
  • To execute.
idiom
0
0
to death
  • To an intolerable degree; extremely:.
    Worried to death.
idiom
0
0
to the death
  • Until one participant in a fight or struggle has died or been killed.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
at death's door
  • Nearly dead.
idiom
0
0
be death on
  • To deal with in a devastating manner.
idiom
0
0
do to death
  • To kill.
  • To use, perform, etc. so often that it becomes tiresome; overdo.
idiom
0
0
in at the death
  • Present at the killing of the quarry by the hounds.
  • Present at the end or culmination.
idiom
0
0
put to death
  • To kill or cause to be killed; execute.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
to death
  • To the extreme; very much.
    He worries me to death.
idiom
0
0
to the death
  • To the very end (of a struggle, quarrel, etc.).
  • To the end of life; always.
idiom
0
0

Origin of death

  • Middle English deeth from Old English dēath dheu-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English deeth, from Old English dēaþ, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz (compare West Frisian dead, Dutch dood, German Tod, Swedish död), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰówtus. More at die.

    From Wiktionary