Skeleton meaning

skĕlĭ-tn
Frequency:
The hard framework of an animal body, supporting the tissues and protecting the organs; specif., all the bones collectively, or the bony framework, of a human being or other vertebrate animal.
noun
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Reduced to the basic or minimal parts or members.

A skeleton crew.

adjective
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An outline or sketch.
noun
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Of or relating to the sport of skeleton.
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One that is very thin or emaciated.
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Of, relating to, or resembling a skeleton.
adjective
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Something reduced to its basic or minimal parts.
noun
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Skeleton is the internal support for something or the most basic and essential part of something.

When there are only a few limited people working, just enough to keep the business open, this is an example of a skeleton crew.

The internal bone and cartilage structure that supports the body are an example of a skeleton.

noun
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A supporting structure or framework, as of a building.
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Anything like a skeleton in any of various ways.
  • A very lean or emaciated person or animal.
  • A supporting framework, as of a building or ship.
  • An outline or preliminary sketch, as of a novel.
  • The meager or devitalized remains of something.
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Of or like a skeleton; specif., of, or having the nature of, the main or essential outline, framework, etc.

A skeleton plan.

adjective
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Greatly reduced.

A skeleton force.

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The internal structure that protects and supports the soft organs, tissues, and other parts of a vertebrate organism, and is composed of bone and cartilage or, in certain animals, cartilage alone.
noun
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The internal structure of vertebrate animals, composed of bone or cartilage, that supports the body, serves as a framework for the attachment of muscles, and protects the vital organs and associated structures.
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A hard protective covering or supporting structure of invertebrate animals.
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(anatomy) The system that provides support to an organism, internal and made up of bones and cartilage in vertebrates, external in some other animals.
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A frame that provides support to a building or other construction.
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(figuratively) A very thin person.

She lost so much weight while she was ill that she became a skeleton.

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(From the sled used, which originally was a bare frame, like a skeleton.) A type of tobogganing in which competitors lie face down, and descend head first (compare luge). See Skeleton (sport)
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(computing) A client-helper procedure that communicates with a stub.

RMI Nomenclature: in RMI, the client helper is a 'stub' and the service helper is a 'skeleton'.

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(geometry) The vertices and edges of a polyhedron, taken collectively.
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An anthropomorphic representation of a skeleton. See Skeleton (undead)

She dressed up as a skeleton for Halloween.

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(figuratively) The central core of something that gives shape to the entire structure.

The skeleton of the organisation is essentially the same as it was ten years ago, but many new faces have come and gone.

noun
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(archaic) To reduce to a skeleton; to skin; to skeletonize.
verb
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(archaic) To minimize.
verb
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The hard external structure that supports, protects, or contains the body of many invertebrates, such as mollusks, crustaceans, and corals, and certain vertebrates, such as turtles.
noun
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skeleton in (one's) closet
  • A source of shame or disgrace, as in a family, that is kept secret.
idiom
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skeleton at the feast
  • A person or event that brings gloom or sadness to an occasion of joy or celebration.
idiom
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skeleton in the closet
  • Some fact, as about one's family, kept secret because of shame or fear of disgrace.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of skeleton

  • Greek skeleton (sōma) dried-up (body) neuter of skeletos from skellesthai to dry up

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ancient Greek σκελετός (skeletos, “dried up, withered, dried body, parched, mummy"), from σκελλώ (skellō, “dry, dry up, make dry, parch"), from Proto-Indo-European *skele- "to parch, whither;" compare Greek Σκληρός "hard".

    From Wiktionary