Frame definitions

frām
Having a wooden framework, usually covered with boards.

A frame house.

adjective
227
6
Basic or skeletal structure around which a thing is built and that gives the thing its shape; framework, as of a house.
noun
224
1
Any of the ten divisions of a game, in each of which the pins are set up anew.
noun
221
1
A syntactic construction with a blank left in it for testing which words will occur there.
noun
218
5
Any of the transverse strengthening members of a ship's hull that extend from the gunwale to the keel.
noun
215
5
A single scanning of the field of vision by the electron beam.
noun
212
4
Any of various machines built on or in a framework.
noun
209
3
The way that anything is constructed or put together; organization; form.
noun
206
3
A set of circumstances that serve as background to an event.
noun
203
4
Condition; state.

A bad frame of mind.

noun
200
3
An established order or system.
noun
197
1
An inning.
noun
194
0
The act of framing an innocent person; frame-up.
noun
191
1
To proceed or succeed; go.
verb
188
2
To shape, fashion, or form, usually according to a pattern; design.

To frame a constitution.

verb
185
4
To put together the parts of; construct.
verb
182
5
To put into words; compose; devise; contrive; conceive.

To frame an excuse.

verb
179
5
To utter.

His lips framed the words.

verb
176
3
To adapt for a particular use; adjust; fit.

A law framed to equalize the tax burden.

verb
173
4
To enclose in a border; provide a border for (a mirror, picture, etc.)
verb
170
2
To photograph or film (objects or activity) within the limits of the frame.
verb
167
4
To falsify evidence, testimony, etc. beforehand in order to make (an innocent person) appear guilty.
verb
164
5
To bring about; cause.
verb
161
4
The presentation of events in a narrative work, especially a work of literature or film, such that characters in the narrative exist in isolation, uninfluenced by, unaware of, and unable to interact with the narrator or audience.
noun
74
2
A pair of eyeglasses, excluding the lenses.

Had new lenses fitted into an old pair of frames.

noun
71
1
A frame-up.
noun
68
2
Shape; form.
noun
65
1
To conceive or design.

Framed an alternate proposal.

verb
62
1
To establish the context for and terminology regarding (a subject of discussion or debate), especially so as to exclude an unwanted point of view.

The question was framed to draw only one answer.

verb
59
0
To enclose in a frame.

Frame a painting.

verb
56
1
The definition of a frame is the general structure that gives a person or thing its shape, or how something is put together.

An example of a frame is the bone structure of the human skeleton.

An example of a frame is a house made of wood and stone.

noun
24
1
A frame is defined as the outside border that holds something in place on all sides.

An example of frame is the enclosed wood structure that holds a picture hanging on a wall.

noun
21
0
The structural elements of a building or other constructed object.

Now that the frame is complete, we can start on the walls.

noun
19
0
(snooker) A complete game of snooker, from break-off until all the balls (as many as necessary to win) have been potted.
noun
19
0
To frame means to put together, form, shape or compose.

An example of to frame is giving feedback with a compliment, a criticism and suggestions for change.

verb
18
1
A structure in the form of a structure of metal uprights and cross pieces with termination points on each side into which components can be mounted and conductors can be mechanically connected. The term is applied to distribution frames for cables and is the origin of the term mainframe computer.
17
0
The structure of a person's body.

His starved flesh hung loosely on his once imposing frame.

noun
16
0
(networking) An independent chunk of data sent over a network.
noun
16
0
In asynchronous serial data communications, a transmission unit comprising a character of data and one or two parity bits, preceded by a start bit, succeeded by a stop bit. Asynchronous communications are said to be character-framed. See Figure F-5. See also asynchronous transmission.
14
0
(bowling) A set of balls whose results are added together for scoring purposes. Usually two balls, but only one ball in the case of a strike, and three balls in the case of a strike or a spare in the last frame of a game.
noun
13
0
(Internet) An individually scrollable region of a webpage.
noun
13
0
In synchronous data communications protocols such as HDLC and SDLC, a message unit. A frame comprises control data, address data, user data, and an error control mechanism.The frame is preceded by a beginning flag and succeeded by an ending flag. The data field of an SDLC frame, for example, can comprise as many as 4,096 octets and the various control fields add another four or six octets. See Figure F-6. See also SDLC and synchronous transmission.
11
0
(philately) The outer decorated portion of a stamp's image, often repeated on several issues although the inner picture may change.
noun
10
0
(baseball, slang) An inning.
noun
10
0
In digital carrier systems E-carrier, J-carrier, and T-carrier, a collection of time slots that repeats every 125 microseconds. In a channelized application, each time slot constitutes a channel. In an unchannelized application, the entire collection of time slots constitutes a channel. Figure F-7 is an illustration of a channelized T1 frame. Note: A T1 and J1 frame is always preceded by a framing bit, which is used for synchronization and other control purposes. An E-1 frame does not require a framing bit, as time slots 0 and 16 serve those functions. See also carrier, channel, E-carrier, framing bit, J-carrier, synchronous, T-carrier, and time slot.
8
0
A rigid, generally rectangular mounting for paper, canvas or other flexible material.

The painting was housed in a beautifully carved frame.

noun
7
0
(film, animation) A division of time on a multimedia timeline, such as 1/30th of a second.
noun
7
0
In video communications, a single photographic image that is one of many in a motion picture. See also frame rate.
5
0
To fit, as for a specific end or purpose; make suitable or comfortable; adapt; adjust.
verb
4
0
A piece of photographic film containing an image.

A film projector shows many frames in a single second.

noun
4
0
To construct by fitting or uniting together various parts; fabricate by union of constituent parts.
verb
1
0
A context for understanding or interpretation.

In this frame, it's easy to ask the question that the investigators missed.

noun
1
0
A structure that gives shape or support.

The frame of a house.

noun
0
0
The structure or physique of a human or animal body.

A worker's sturdy frame.

noun
0
0
An open structure or rim for encasing, holding, or bordering.

A window frame; the frame of a mirror.

noun
0
0
A closed, often rectangular border of drawn or printed lines.
noun
0
0
The edge, usually rectangular, delimiting the boundaries of an image.
noun
0
0
The bounded area of a visual image, as in photography or film.

Filled the frame with a cast of thousands.

noun
0
0
One of the set of still images that constitute a film or video.
noun
0
0
A single image, as in a comic strip or graphic novel, usually bounded by a rectangular line.
noun
0
0
A rectangular area in which text or graphics can be shown, especially one of several rectangular areas on a web page displaying different documents simultaneously.
noun
0
0
A general structure or system.

The frame of government.

noun
0
0
A general state or condition.

The news put me into a better frame of mind.

noun
0
0
A frame of reference.
noun
0
0
The context in which discourse occurs.
noun
0
0
A pattern for a syntactic construction in which one of a group of words can vary.
noun
0
0
A round or period of play in some games, such as bowling and billiards.
noun
0
0
An inning.
noun
0
0
To put together the structural parts of; construct the frame of.

Frame a house.

verb
0
0
To put into words; formulate.

Frame a reply.

verb
0
0
To form (words) silently with the lips.
verb
0
0
To make up evidence or contrive events so as to incriminate (a person) falsely.
verb
0
0
To prearrange (a contest) so as to ensure a desired fraudulent outcome; fix.

Frame a prizefight.

verb
0
0
To catch (a pitch) in such a way as to make it appear to have passed through the strike zone.
verb
0
0
To go; proceed.
verb
0
0
Anything made of parts fitted together according to a design.
noun
0
0
Body structure in general; build.
noun
0
0
The skeletal framework of an automotive chassis, on which the body and various mechanical components are mounted.
noun
0
0
The case or border into which a window, door, etc. is set and which serves as a structural support.
noun
0
0
A border, often ornamental, surrounding a picture, etc.; also, the picture or other matter inside such a border.
noun
0
0
The framing of a pair of eyeglasses; rims.
noun
0
0
Each of the small exposures composing a strip of film.
noun
0
0
The rectangular image on a film screen, or the particular objects or activity focused on by the camera.
noun
0
0
The period of play required to pocket all the balls.
noun
0
0
(1) In computer graphics, one screenful of data or its equivalent storage space. See frame buffer.
0
0
To bring or put into form or order; adjust the parts or elements of; compose; contrive; plan; devise.
verb
0
0
Of a constructed object such as a building, to put together the structural elements.

Once we finish framing the house, we'll hang tin on the roof.

verb
0
0
Of a picture such as a painting or photograph, to place inside a decorative border.
verb
0
0
To position visually within a fixed boundary.

The director frames the fishing scene very well.

verb
0
0
To construct in words so as to establish a context for understanding or interpretation.

How would you frame your accomplishments?

The way the opposition has framed the argument makes it hard for us to win.

verb
0
0
(criminology) Conspire to incriminate falsely a presumably innocent person.

The gun had obviously been placed in her car in an effort to frame her.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, dialectal, mining) To wash ore with the aid of a frame.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, dialectal) To move.

An oath, and a threat to set Throttler on me if I did not frame off, rewarded my perseverance. ― E. Brontë.

verb
0
0

Origin of frame

From Middle English framen, fremen, fremmen (“to construct, build, strengthen, refresh, perform, execute, profit, avail”), from Old English framian, fremian, fremman (“to profit, avail, advance, perform, promote, execute, commit, do”), from Proto-Germanic *framjaną (“to perform, promote”), from Proto-Indo-European *promo- (“front, forward”). Cognate with Low German framen (“to commit, effect”), Danish fremme (“to promote, further, perform”), Swedish främja (“to promote, encourage, forster”), Icelandic fremja (“to commit”). More at from.