From meaning

frŭm, frŏm; frəm when unstressed
With (a person or thing) as the source, maker, sender, speaker, teacher, etc.

A crate made from wood, a letter from Mary, facts learned from reading.

preposition
11
3
At a place not near to; out of contact with.

Away from danger, far from home.

preposition
7
3
Out of the possibility of; prevented or excluded with respect to.

Kept from going on the hike.

preposition
6
4
Out of the possession or control of; free with respect to.

Released from jail.

preposition
5
3
From is defined as a starting point, removal or separation.

An example of from is the starting time of an open house, such as "from 1 pm to 4 pm."

An example of from is to take a toy away out of the hands of a child.

An example of from are a cottage and a garage that are separated by 100 feet.

preposition
4
3
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Out of the whole of; out of unity or alliance with.

Take two from four; he withdrew from the class.

preposition
3
3
(slang) About.

They don't know from good taste.

preposition
2
1
Because of.

Faint from hunger.

preposition
2
2
As not being like.

To tell one sister from the other.

preposition
2
2
Because of; caused by; having the reason or motive of.

To tremble from fear.

preposition
2
2
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Used to indicate separation, removal, or exclusion.

Keep someone from making a mistake; liberation from bondage.

preposition
0
0
Used to indicate differentiation.

Know right from wrong.

preposition
0
0
Starting with (the first of two named limits)

From noon to midnight.

preposition
0
0
Out of; derived or coming out of.

He took a comb from his pocket; lava spewed from the volcano.

preposition
0
1
With the source or provenance of or at.

This wine comes from France; I got a letter from my brother.

preposition
0
1
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With the origin, starting point or initial reference of or at.

He had books piled from floor to ceiling; he left yesterday from Chicago; face away from the wall.

preposition
0
1

An umbrella protects from the sun; he knows right from wrong.

preposition
0
1
(chiefly maine) from away
  • Not native to a state or locality.
idiom
2
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

from away

Origin of from

  • Middle English from Old English fram forward, from per1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English from (“from”), from Old English from, fram (“forward, from”), from Proto-Germanic *fram (“forward, from, away”), from Proto-Indo-European *pr-, *pro-, *perəm-, *prom- (“forth, forward”), from *por- (“forward, through”). Cognate with Old Saxon fram (“from”) and Old High German fram (“from”), Danish frem (“forth, forward”), Danish fra (“from”), Swedish fram (“forth, forward”), Swedish från (“from”), Icelandic fram (“forward, on”), Icelandic frá (“from”), Albanian pre, prej. More at fro.

    From Wiktionary