Caulk meaning

kôk
To make watertight or airtight by filling or sealing.

Caulk a pipe joint; caulked the cracks between the boards with mud.

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To make (a boat) watertight by packing seams with a waterproof material, such as oakum or pitch.
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To apply caulking.

Caulked all around the window frame.

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Caulking.
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To stop up (the cracks, seams, etc.) of (a window frame, boat, etc.) as with a puttylike sealant or oakum.
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To make (a joint of overlapping plates) tight by hammering the edge of one plate into the side of the other.
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A soft, resilient, puttylike compound for use in caulking.
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A composition of vehicle and pigment used at ambient temperatures for filling/sealing joints or junctures, that remains elastic for an extended period of time after application.
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(nautical) To drive oakum into the seams of a ship's wooden deck or hull to make it watertight.
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To apply caulking to joints, cracks, or a juncture of different materials.
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Origin of caulk

  • Middle English cauken to press from Old North French cauquer from Latin calcāre to tread from calx heel
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old Northern French cauquer, from Late Latin calicō.
    From Wiktionary