Pigment meaning

pĭgmənt
Frequency:
A substance, such as chlorophyll or melanin, that produces a characteristic color in plant or animal tissue.
noun
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A substance used as coloring.
noun
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2
Coloring matter, usually in the form of an insoluble powder, mixed with oil, water, etc. to make paints.
noun
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2
An organic compound that gives a characteristic color to plant or animal tissues and is involved in vital processes. Chlorophyll, which gives a green color to plants, and hemoglobin, which gives blood its red color, are examples of pigments.
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To color with pigment.
verb
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A substance, such as chlorophyll or melanin, that produces a characteristic color in plant or animal tissue.
noun
1
1
A substance used as coloring.
noun
1
1
Dry coloring matter, usually an insoluble powder, to be mixed with water, oil, or another base to produce paint and similar products.
noun
1
3
A substance or material used as coloring.
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1
(biology) Any color in plant or animal cells.

Chlorophyll is the pigment responsible for most plants' green colouring.

noun
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A dry colorant, usually an insoluble powder.

Umber is a pigment made from clay containing iron and manganese oxide.

noun
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To add color or pigment to something.
verb
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The definition of a pigment is a substance used to color paint, ink or other substances.

A red powder produced with liquid to produce paint is an example of pigment.

noun
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Pigment is to take on color.

An example of pigment is when your face blushes red with embarrassment.

verb
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To color with pigment.
verb
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Any coloring matter in the cells and tissues of plants or animals.
noun
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To take on or cause to take on pigment; color or become colored.
verb
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Origin of pigment

  • Middle English spice, red dye from Latin pigmentum from pingere to paint peig- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin pigmentum (“pigment"), itself from pingō (“I paint") + -mentum; variants of this word may have been known in Old English (e.g. 12th century pyhmentum).

    From Wiktionary