Stain meaning

stān
Stain is defined as to dirty, dishonor or to apply some sort of coloring.

An example of stain is to spill sauce on your shirt.

An example of stain is to bring shame upon a family by doing something illegal.

An example of stain is to add a paint to a redwood fence to protect it from the weather.

verb
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A liquid substance applied especially to wood that penetrates the surface and imparts a rich color.
noun
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To treat a specimen for the microscope with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
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To discolor, soil, or spot.

The spilled juice stained the carpet.

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To bring into disrepute; taint or tarnish.

The scandal stained the mayor's reputation.

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To change the color of (a piece of wood, for example) by applying a stain.
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To treat (a specimen for the microscope) with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
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To produce or receive discolorations.

Upholstery that stains easily.

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A discolored or soiled spot or smudge.

A stain that was difficult to scrub out.

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A diminishment of one's moral character or good reputation by being associated with something disgraceful.
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A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.
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To spoil the appearance of by patches or streaks of color or dirt; discolor; spot.
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To bring shame upon (someone's character, reputation, etc.); taint; disgrace; dishonor.
verb
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To change the appearance of (wood, glass, etc.) by applying a dye, pigment, etc.
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To treat (material for microscopic study) with a coloring matter that facilitates study, as by making transparent parts visible or by producing a different effect upon different structures or tissues.
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To impart or take a color or stain.
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A discoloration, streak, or spot resulting from staining.
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A moral blemish; dishonor; guilt; taint.

A stain on one's reputation.

noun
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A substance used to impart color in staining.
  • A dye or pigment in solution, esp. one that penetrates a wood surface.
  • A dye used to stain material for microscopic study.
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A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.
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noun
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A substance used to soak into a surface and colour it.
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A reagent or dye used to stain microscope specimens so as to make some structures visible.
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To discolour something.

To stain the hand with dye.

Armour stained with blood.

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To taint or tarnish someone's character or reputation.
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To coat a surface with a stain.

To stain wood with acids, coloured washes, paint rubbed in, etc.

The stained glass used for church windows.

verb
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To treat a microscope specimen with a dye.
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To cause to seem inferior or soiled by comparison.
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The definition of a stain is a spot, a moral wrongdoing, or something used to add color.

An example of a stain is grease on a shirt.

An example of a stain on a politician's record is when he is caught stealing from the city budget.

An example of a stain is a box of fabric dye which can be used to turn a white shirt into a blue shirt.

noun
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Origin of stain

  • Middle English steinen partly from Old French desteindre desteign- to deprive of color (des- dis-) (teindre to dye) (from Latin tingere) and partly from Old Norse steina to paint

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English steinen, steynen (“to stain, colour, paint"), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse steina (“to stain, colour, paint"), from steinn (“stone, mineral blee, colour, stain"), from Proto-Norse ᛊᛏᚨᛁᚾᚨᛉ (stainaz), from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (“stone"), from Proto-Indo-European *stAy- (“stone"). Cognate with Old English stān (“stone"). More at stone.

    From Wiktionary

  • In some senses, influenced by unrelated Middle English disteynen (“to discolor, remove the colour from"; literally, "de-colour"), from Anglo-Norman desteindre (“to remove the colour from, bleach"), from Old French desteindre (“to remove the color from, bleach"), from des- (“dis-, de-, un-") + teindre (“to dye"), from Latin tingo.

    From Wiktionary