Lit meaning

lĭt
Lit means to have brightened something with light or flames.

An example of lit is to have started a fire.

An example of lit is to have turned on a lamp.

verb
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Lit is defined as a common abbreviation for literature.

An example of lit is taking a college course called English Lit.

noun
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The definition of lit is a slang term for drunk or intoxicated.

An example of lit is to tell a story about a friend who had too many drinks the night before and say “He was lit.”

adjective
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Literature.
abbreviation
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verb
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noun
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Literary.
abbreviation
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(informal.) Drunk or drugged. Often used with up.
adjective
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Literature, especially as an academic subject.

Enjoyed my course in French lit.

noun
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verb
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Liter(s)
abbreviation
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Literature.
abbreviation
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(obsolete) Little.
adjective
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Liter.
abbreviation
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Abbreviation of literature.
noun
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(obsolete) Little.
noun
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adjective
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(slang) Intoxicated or under the influence of drugs; stoned.
adjective
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Literally.
abbreviation
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Simple past tense and past participle of light.
verb
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(slang) Sexually aroused (usually a female), especially visibly sexually aroused (e.g., labial swelling is present)
adjective
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(UK dialectal) Colour; blee; dye; stain.
noun
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To colour; dye.
verb
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Abbreviated form of literature.
noun
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Literary.
abbreviation
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(US, dialectal) To run, or light.
verb
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Origin of lit

  • From Middle English lit, from Old Norse litr (“colour, dye, complexion, face, countenance”), from Proto-Germanic *wlitiz, *wlitaz (“sight, face”), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (“to see”). Cognate with Icelandic litur (“colour”), Old English wlite (“brightness, appearance, form, aspect, look, countenance, beauty, splendor, adornment”), Old English wlītan (“to gaze, look, observe”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lit, lut, from Old English lȳt (“little, few”), from Proto-Germanic *lūtilaz (“little, small”), from Proto-Indo-European *leud- (“to cower, hunch over”). Cognate with Old Saxon lut (“little”), Middle High German lützen (“to make small or low, decrease”). More at little.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lihte, from Old English līhtte, first and third person singular preterit of līhtan (“to light”). More at light.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English litten, liten, from Old Norse lita (“to colour”), from litr (“colour”). See above.

    From Wiktionary

  • Short for literature.

    From Wiktionary