Tarnish meaning

tärnĭsh
To lose luster; become discolored.

A metal that tarnishes quickly.

verb
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To dull the luster of or discolor the surface of (a metal) as by exposure to air.
verb
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To dull the luster of; discolor, especially by exposure to air or dirt.

Being in the ground for so long tarnished the old coins.

verb
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Tarnish is defined as to spoil or to discolor the surface of a piece of metal.

An example of to tarnish is to expose silver to sulfur and air.

verb
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The condition of being tarnished.

No sign of tarnish on the frame.

noun
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A film or layer of discoloration on a metal surface caused by corrosion or oxidation.
noun
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To lose luster; grow dull; discolor, as from oxidation.
verb
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The film of discoloration on the surface of tarnished metal.
noun
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A stain; blemish.
noun
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Oxidation or discoloration, especially of a decorative metal exposed to air.
noun
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(intransitive) To oxidize or discolor due to oxidation.

Careful storage of silver will prevent it from tarnishing.

verb
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He is afraid that he will tarnish his reputation if he disagrees.

verb
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(intransitive, figuratively) To lose its lustre or attraction; to become dull.
verb
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To become less enjoyable or estimable.

Her admiration for the movie's producer quickly tarnished.

verb
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The condition of being disgraced or made less estimable.

The tarnish on his reputation.

noun
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To become sullied, soiled, spoiled, marred, etc.
verb
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The condition of being tarnished; dullness.
noun
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Origin of tarnish

  • Middle English ternisshen from Old French ternir terniss- to dull from terne dull of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French terniss-, stem of ternir (“to make dull, deaden, tarnish"), from Old French ternir (“to make dim, make wan"), from Frankish *tarnjan (“to cover up, conceal, hide"), from Proto-Germanic *darnijanÄ… (“to conceal"), from Proto-Indo-European *dher(ǝ)-, *dhrÄ“- (“to hold, hold tight, support"). Cognate with Old High German *tarnjan, tarnen (“to hide, cover up, conceal") (Modern German tarnen), Old English dyrnan, diernan (“to keep secret, conceal, hide, restrain, repress"). More at dern, darn.

    From Wiktionary