Dull meaning

dŭl
Not active or busy; slack.

A dull period for sales.

adjective
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The definition of dull is someone who is stupid or boring or something that is not shiny or something that is not sharp.

An example of dull is a book that is so boring you can't get past page ten.

An example of dull is a rusted piece of metal that has not been polished and that no longer has any shine.

An example of dull is a knife that no longer cuts well because it is no longer very sharp.

adjective
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Lacking sensitivity; blunted in feeling or perception.

Dull to grief.

adjective
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Mentally slow; stupid.
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Not shiny; having a matte finish or no particular luster or brightness.

Choose a dull finish to hide fingerprints.

A dull fire or lamp; a dull red or yellow; a dull mirror.

adjective
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It's a dull day.

adjective
2
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Not having a sharp edge or point; blunt.

A dull knife.

adjective
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Not bright or intelligent; stupid; slow of understanding.
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Insensible; unfeeling.
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To render dull; to remove or blunt an edge or something that was sharp.

Years of misuse have dulled the tools.

verb
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To soften, moderate or blunt; to make dull, stupid, or sluggish; to stupefy.

He drinks to dull the pain.

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(intransitive) To lose a sharp edge; to become dull.

A razor will dull with use.

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To render dim or obscure; to sully; to tarnish.
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Intellectually weak or obtuse; stupid.
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Lacking responsiveness or alertness; insensitive.

Half-asleep and dull to the noises in the next room.

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Dispirited; depressed.

A dull mood.

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To make or become dull.
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Physically slow; slow-moving; sluggish.
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Lacking spirit, zest, etc.; not lively; listless, insipid, etc.
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Causing boredom; tedious.

A dull party.

adjective
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Not pointed or sharp; blunt; not keen.

A dull blade.

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Not felt keenly; not acute.

A dull headache.

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Not distinct, resonant, etc.; muffled.

A dull thud.

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Gloomy; cloudy.

Dull weather.

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To make or become dull.
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Lacking the ability to cut easily; not sharp.

All these knives are dull.

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He sat through the dull lecture and barely stayed awake.

When does having a dull personality ever get you a girlfriend? Even if you get one, how does being dull help you keep a relationship for over a year?

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Origin of dull

  • Middle English dul Old English dol
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English dull, dul (also dyll, dill, dwal), from Old English dol (“dull, foolish, erring, heretical; foolish, silly; presumptuous”), from Proto-Germanic *dulaz, a variant of *dwalaz (“stunned, mad, foolish, misled”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwel-, *dʰewel- (“to dim, dull, cloud, make obscure, swirl, whirl”). Cognate with Scots dull, doll (“slow to understand or hear, deaf, dull”), North Frisian dol (“rash, unthinking, giddy, flippant”), Dutch dol (“crazy, mad, insane”), Low German dul, dol (“mad, silly, stupid, fatuous”), German toll (“crazy, mad, wild, fantastic”), Danish dval (“foolish, absurd”), Icelandic dulur (“secretive, silent”).
    From Wiktionary