Low Definition

lowed, lower, lowest, lowing, lows, lower 1
adjective
lower, lowest, lower 1
Of little height or elevation; not high or tall.
Webster's New World
Depressed below the surrounding surface or normal elevation.
Low land.
Webster's New World
Of little depth; shallow.
The river is low this time of year.
Webster's New World
Situated below the surrounding surfaces.
Water standing in low spots.
American Heritage
Relatively close to the ground.
Low clouds.
Webster's New World
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adverb
In, at, to, or toward a low degree, level, place, position, etc.
Hit them low.
Webster's New World
In a low manner.
Webster's New World
In or to a reduced, humbled, or degraded condition.
Brought low by failure.
American Heritage
Quietly; softly.
Speak low.
Webster's New World
With a deep pitch.
Webster's New World
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noun
lows
Something low.
Webster's New World
A region of atmospheric pressure that is below normal.
American Heritage
The characteristic sound of a cow.
Webster's New World
The low gear configuration of a transmission.
American Heritage
Flame or blaze.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
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verb
lowed, lowing, lows
To make the characteristic vocal sound of a cow; moo.
Webster's New World
To express by lowing.
Webster's New World

(obsolete) To depress; to lower.

Wiktionary

Obsolete simple past tense of laugh.

Wiktionary

(intransitive) To moo.

The cattle were lowing.
Wiktionary
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idiom
lay low
  • to cause to fall by hitting
  • to overcome or kill
Webster's New World
lie low
  • to keep oneself hidden or inconspicuous
  • to wait patiently for an opportunity
Webster's New World

Other Word Forms of Low

Noun

Singular:
low
Plural:
lows

Adjective

Base Form:
low
Comparative:
lower 1
Superlative:
lowest

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Low

Origin of Low

  • From Middle English lowe, lohe, lāh, from Old Norse lāgr (“low"), from Proto-Germanic *lÄ“gaz (“lying, flat, situated near the ground, low"), from Proto-Indo-European *legÊ°- (“to lie"). Cognate with Scots laich (“low"), Low German leg (“low, feeble, bad"), Danish lav (“low"), Icelandic lágur (“low"), West Frisian leech (“low"), North Frisian leeg, liig (“low"), Dutch laag (“low"), German läge (“lying, low"). More at lie.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lowen (“to low"), from Old English hlōwan (“to low, bellow, roar"), from Proto-Germanic *hlōanÄ… (“to call, shout"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kale-, *klā-, *klÄ“- (“to shout, call"). Cognate with Dutch loeien (“to low"), Middle High German lüejen (“to roar"), Swedish dialectal lumma (“to roar"), Latin calō (“I call"), Ancient Greek καλέω (kaleō), Latin clāmō (“I shout, claim"). More at claim.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lowe, loghe, from Old Norse logi (“fire, flame, sword"), from Proto-Germanic *lugô (“flame, blaze"), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (“light"). Cognate with Icelandic logi (“flame"), Swedish lÃ¥ga (“flame"), Danish lue (“flame"), German Lohe (“blaze, flames"), North Frisian leag (“fire, flame"), Old English lÄ«eÄ¡ (“fire, flame, lightning"). More at leye, light.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lowen to moo from Old English hlōwan kelə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English hlāw, hlÇ£w (“burial mound"). Obsolete by the 19th century, survives in toponymy as -low.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English hlōg, preterite of hliehhan (“to laugh"). More at laugh.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English loue from Old Norse lāgr legh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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