Leech meaning

lēch
The definition of a leech is a type of worm found in water or in wet areas with a strong sucker on both ends of its body which it uses to suck blood from its hosts, or a person who attaches themselves to another person like a parasite.

An example of a leech is a flat black worm that sticks to you in a swamp.

An example of a leech is someone who befriends a elderly person in order to get their money.

noun
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To leech means to cling to something or take all that thing has.

An example of to leech is for a loan shark to take the money of someone who defaults on a loan.

verb
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One that preys on or clings to another; a parasite.
noun
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To drain the essence or exhaust the resources of.
verb
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To attach oneself to another in the manner of a leech.
verb
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Either vertical edge of a square sail.
noun
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The after edge of a fore-and-aft sail.
noun
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Any of various chiefly aquatic carnivorous or bloodsucking annelid worms of the class (or subclass) Hirudinea, of which one species (Hirudo medicinalis) was formerly widely used by physicians for therapeutic bloodletting.
noun
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To bleed with leeches.
verb
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A physician.
noun
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Any of a subclass (Hirudinea) of mostly flattened, annelid worms living in water or wet earth and having a well-developed sucker at each end: most are bloodsuckers, and one species (Hirudo medicinalis) has been used in medicine, esp. in former times, to bleed patients.
noun
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A person who clings to another to gain some personal advantage; parasite.
noun
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To heal.
verb
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To apply leeches to; bleed with leeches.
verb
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To cling to (another) as a parasite; drain dry.
verb
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To act as a parasite.
verb
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The after edge of a fore-and-aft sail.
noun
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Either of the vertical edges of a square sail.
noun
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Any of various chiefly aquatic carnivorous or bloodsucking annelid worms of the class (or subclass) Hirudinea, of which one species (Hirudo medicinalis) was formerly widely used by physicians for therapeutic bloodletting.
noun
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To bleed with leeches.
verb
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A person who takes without giving. A free loader. See bandwidth leech and BitTorrent leech.
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An aquatic blood-sucking annelid of class Hirudinea, especially Hirudo medicinalis.
noun
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A person who derives profit from others, in a parasitic fashion.
noun
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(medicine, dated) A glass tube designed for drawing blood from a scarified part by means of a vacuum.
noun
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To apply a leech medicinally, so that it sucks blood from the patient.
verb
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To drain (resources) without giving back.

Bert leeched hundreds of files from the BBS, but never uploaded anything in return.

verb
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(archaic) A physician.
noun
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(paganism, Heathenry) A healer.
noun
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(medicine) A glass tube adapted for drawing blood from a scarified part by means of a vacuum.
noun
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(nautical) The vertical edge of a square sail.
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(nautical) The aft edge of a triangular sail.
noun
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To leech is defined as to get a file on a file sharing site that is being hosted by another user without allowing your file to be copied at the same time.

An example of to leech is to download a movie on IsoHunt without sharing it to other users to download.

verb
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A physician.
noun
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Origin of leech

  • Middle English leche probably from Middle Low German līk leech line leig- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English leche physician, leech from Old English lǣce leg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English leche (“physician"), from Old English lǣċe (“doctor, physician"), from Proto-Germanic *lÄ“kijaz (“doctor"), from Proto-Indo-European *lÄ“g(')- (“doctor"). Cognate with Old Frisian lÄ“tza (“physician"), Old Saxon lāki (“physician"), Old High German lāhhi (“doctor, healer"), Danish læge (“doctor, surgeon"), Gothic 𐌻𐌴𐌺𐌴𐌹𐍃 (lekeis, “physician"), Old Irish líaig (“exorcist, doctor").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English lek, leche, lyche, from Old Norse lík (“leechline"), from Proto-Germanic *lÄ«kÄ… (compare West Frisian lyk (“band"), Dutch lijk (“boltrope"), Middle High German geleich (“joint, limb")), from Proto-Indo-European *leiĝ- "˜to bind' (compare Latin ligō (“tie, bind"), Ukrainian налигати (nalýhaty, “to bridle, fetter"), Albanian lidh (“to bind")).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English leche (“blood-sucking worm"), from Old English lǣċe (“blood-sucking worm"), akin to Middle Dutch lāke (“blood-sucking worm") (Dutch laak).

    From Wiktionary