Worm meaning

wûrm
The definition of a worm is an animal that is slender, soft and often segmented, or an insect larva, or a nasty person, or an unauthorized computer program.

An example of a worm is a roundworm.

An example of a worm is the larva of a caterpillar.

An example of a worm is a person who always lies and cheats.

An example of a worm is a computer program that duplicates itself, fillling up all the storage space on a drive.

noun
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To move, proceed, etc. like a worm, in a winding, creeping, or devious manner.
verb
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To bring about, make, etc. in a winding, creeping, or devious manner.

To worm one's way through a tunnel.

verb
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To insinuate (oneself) into a situation, conversation, etc.
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Worm is defined as to creep around, wind through or sneak around in a suspicious way.

An example of worm is to crawl through a tunnel on your belly.

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Any of various invertebrates, especially an annelid, flatworm, nematode, or nemertean, having a long, flexible, rounded or flattened body, often without obvious appendages.
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Any of various crawling insect larvae, such as a grub or a caterpillar, having a soft elongated body.
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Any of various other animals, such as a shipworm or a slowworm, having a long slender limbless body.
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An insidiously tormenting or devouring force.
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A person regarded as pitiable or contemptible.
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Infestation of the intestines or other parts of the body with parasitic worms; helminthiasis.
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A malicious program that replicates itself until it fills all of the storage space on a drive or network.
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To make (one's way) with the sinuous crawling motion of a worm.
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To work (one's way or oneself) subtly or gradually; insinuate.

She wormed her way into his confidence.

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To elicit by artful or devious means. Usually used with out of .

Wormed a confession out of the suspect.

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To cure of intestinal worms.

Wormed the dog.

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To wrap yarn or twine spirally around (rope).
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To move in a manner suggestive of a worm.
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To make one's way by artful or devious means.

He can't worm out of this situation.

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Write once, read many.
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Any of many slender, soft-bodied animals, some segmented, that live by burrowing underground, in water, or as parasites, including the annelids, nemerteans, nematodes, platyhelminths, acanthocephalans, and gordian worms.
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An abject, wretched, or contemptible person.
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Something that gnaws or distresses one inwardly, suggesting a parasitic worm.

The worm of conscience.

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Something thought of as being wormlike because of its spiral shape, etc.
  • The thread of a screw.
  • The coil of a still.
  • An Archimedean screw or similar apparatus.
  • A short, rotating screw that meshes with the teeth of a worm gear or a rack.
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Any organ or part resembling a worm, as the vermiform process.
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An unauthorized, disruptive program, typically spread through communication lines, that creates copies of itself, thereby depleting a disk's or system's available memory.
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To extract (information, secrets, etc.) by insinuation, cajolery, or subtle questioning.
verb
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To purge of intestinal worms.
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To fill the spaces between the strands of (a rope) with lengths of yarn or cord in order to make the surface even.
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To rid (tobacco plants) of worms or grubs.
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Any of various invertebrates, especially an annelid, flatworm, nematode, or nemertean, having a long, flexible, rounded or flattened body, often without obvious appendages.
noun
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Any of various crawling insect larvae, such as a grub or a caterpillar, having a soft elongated body.
noun
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Any of various other animals, such as a shipworm or a slowworm, having a long slender limbless body.
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Infestation of the intestines or other parts of the body with parasitic worms; helminthiasis.
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To treat intestinal worms.

Wormed the dog.

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Any of various invertebrate animals having a soft, long body that is round or flattened and usually lacks limbs. The term worm is used variously to refer to the segmented worms (or annelids, such as the earthworm), roundworms (or nematodes), flatworms (or platyhelminths), and various other groups.
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A destructive computer program that copies itself over and over until it fills all of the storage space on a computer's hard drive or on a network.
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(1) A destructive program that replicates itself internally or throughout the network. A worm can do damage by sheer volume, consuming internal storage and memory resources or by exhausting network bandwidth. It can also deposit Trojans that turn every computer in the network into zombies for spam, denial of service (DOS) or some other malicious attack. Very often, the terms "worm" and "virus" are used synonymously; however, worm implies automatic reproduction. See virus, logic bomb, smartphone virus, denial-of-service attack, spam, Stuxnet, Worm.ExploreZip virus and Morris worm.
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A type of malware that replicates itself across a computer network by making copies of itself, which it sends to other computers. A worm embeds itself in memory and may replicate itself so many times that it causes the host to crash. Note that a worm is neither a Trojan horse nor a virus. See also malware, spyware, Trojan horse, and virus.
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A worm is a self-replicating, self-contained software program that does not need to be part of another program to propagate. A virus, in contrast, attaches itself to and becomes part of another executable program. Worms as well as viruses typically contain some kind of malicious payload besides the propagation and infection mechanism. On February 3, 2005, Sophos, Inc., a company providing virus detection and other security tools, warned that a version of the Bobax-H worm, hidden within Saddam Hussein photos showing him deceased, invaded computers and carried message warnings such as “Saddam Hussein: Attempted Escape. Shot Dead.” Other versions of the worm had pictures of an allegedly captured Osama Bin Laden. If activated, the payload had the same effect as the Sasser worm. Security experts worldwide have been exploring various ways of stopping worms in their tracks. In April 2005, Professor Shigang Chen and Professor Sanjay Ranka at the University of Florida said they designed an Internet worm early-warning system to detect the initial sign of a malware attack. Professors Chen and Ranka said that their suggested early-warning system monitors a “used” address space and relies on RESET packets to find the scan sources. Their research paper focuses on TCP-focused worms and details a means of avoiding so-called “false positives” by viewing reply traffic from targets instead of monitoring the SYN packets to track half-open connections. Inquirer. Saddam Hussein “Death” Virus on Loose. [Online, February 3, 2005.] Breakthrough Publishing Ltd. Website http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=21080; Naraine, R. Researchers Propose Early Warning System for Worms. [Online, April 20, 2005.] Ziff Davis Media Website. http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1788294,00.asp.
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A generally tubular invertebrate of the annelid phylum.
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A contemptible or devious being.

Don't try to run away, you little worm!

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(computing) A self-replicating program that propagates through a network.
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(cricket) A graphical representation of the total runs scored in an innings.
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Anything helical, especially the thread of a screw.
  • A spiral instrument or screw, often like a double corkscrew, used for drawing balls from firearms.
  • (anatomy) A muscular band in the tongue of some animals, such as dogs; the lytta.
  • The condensing tube of a still, often curved and wound to save space.
  • A short revolving screw whose threads drive, or are driven by, a worm wheel by gearing into its teeth or cogs.
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(archaic) A dragon or mythological serpent.
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Shakespeare.

'Tis slander, / Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue / Outvenoms all the worms of Nile.

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Longfellow.

When Cerberus perceived us, the great worm, / His mouth he opened and displayed his tusks.

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An internal tormentor; something that gnaws or afflicts one's mind with remorse.

The worm of conscience still begnaw thy soul! "” Richard III, William Shakespeare.

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(mathematics) A strip of linked tiles sharing parallel edges in a tiling.
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To make (one's way) with a crawling motion.

We wormed our way through the underbrush.

verb
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(intransitive, figuratively) To work one's way by artful or devious means.
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(figuratively) To work (one's way or oneself) (into) gradually or slowly; to insinuate.

He wormed his way into the organization.

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To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; often followed by out.
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(figuratively) To obtain information from someone through artful or devious means (usually used with out of)
verb
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(nautical) To fill in the contlines of a rope before parcelling and serving.

Worm and parcel with the lay; turn and serve the other way.

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To deworm an animal.
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(intransitive) To move with one's body dragging the ground.
verb
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To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of (a dog, etc.) for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw, and formerly supposed to guard against canine madness.
verb
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To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm.
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Any disease or disorder caused by the presence of parasitic worms in the intestines, etc.
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can of worms
  • A complex, usually unpleasant problem.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of worm

  • Middle English from Old English wurm variant of wyrm wer-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English worm, werm, wurm, wirm, from Old English wyrm "˜snake, worm', from Proto-Germanic *wurmiz (compare Dutch worm, West Frisian wjirm, German Wurm, Danish orm), from Proto-Indo-European *wrÌ¥mis (compare Latin vermis '"˜worm', Lithuanian var̃mas "˜insect, midge', Albanian rrime "˜rainworm', Ancient Greek ῥόμος (rhomos, “woodworm")), possibly from *wer- "˜to turn'. First computer usage by John Brunner in his 1975 book The Shockwave Rider.
    From Wiktionary