Edge Definition

ĕj
edged, edges, edging
noun
edges
The thin, sharp, cutting part of a blade.
Webster's New World
The degree of sharpness of a cutting blade.
American Heritage
The quality of being sharp or keen.
Webster's New World
The projecting ledge or brink, as of a cliff.
Webster's New World
An intense, harsh, or irritable quality.
His voice had a distinct edge.
Webster's New World
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verb
edged, edges, edging
To move sideways.
Webster's New World
To give an edge to (a blade); sharpen.
American Heritage
To form or put an edge on; provide an edge for.
Webster's New World
To make (one's way) sideways, as through a crowd.
Webster's New World
To move gradually or cautiously.
To edge away from danger.
Webster's New World
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other
Originally, Enhanced Data rates for Global Evolution.A 2.5G standard (1999) developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) as the final stage in the evolution of data communications within the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) standards. The only IMT-2000 specification based on time division multiple access (TDMA) rather than code division multiple access (CDMA), EDGE supports data transmission rates up to 473.6 kbps over GSM channels 200 kHz wide through an improved modulation technique known as 8-Phase Shift Keying (8-PSK), which involves eight levels of phase shift and, therefore, supports three bits per symbol. EDGE employs frequency division duplex (FDD) to support bidirectional communications over 124 channels, each of which supports 8 time slots. EDGE supports two modes of operation.
Webster's New World Telecom
idiom
on edge
  • Highly tense or nervous; irritable.
American Heritage
on the edge
  • In a precarious position.
  • In a state of keen excitement, as from danger or risk:
American Heritage
on edge
  • so tense or nervous as to be easily upset; irritable
  • eager; impatient
Webster's New World
set someone's teeth on edge
  • to give a sensation of tingling discomfort, as the sound of a fingernail scraped on a slate does
  • to irritate; provoke
Webster's New World
take the edge off
  • to dull the intensity, force, or pleasure of
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Edge

Noun

Singular:
edge
Plural:
edges

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Edge

Origin of Edge

  • Middle English egge, from Old English ecg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō (compare Dutch egge, German Ecke, Swedish egg), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (“sharp”) (compare Welsh hogi (“to sharpen, hone”), Latin aciēs (“sharp”), acus (“needle”), Latvian ašs, ass (“sharp”), Ancient Greek ἀκίς (akis, “needle”), ἀκμή (akmē, “point”), and Persian آس (ās, “grinding stone”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English egge from Old English ecg ak- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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