Edge meaning

ĕj
To edge is defined as to give something a border or to slowly move in a specific direction.

An example of edge is when you attach a fancy border onto a pillow.

An example of edge is when you slowly inch forward.

verb
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The thin, sharp, cutting part of a blade.
noun
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The projecting ledge or brink, as of a cliff.
noun
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The quality of being sharp or keen.
noun
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To move gradually or hesitantly.

The child edged toward the door.

verb
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An intense, harsh, or irritable quality.

His voice had a distinct edge.

noun
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To move sideways.
verb
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The boundary line of a surface.
noun
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(also figuratively) The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe; that which cuts as an edge does, or wounds deeply, etc.
noun
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The edge is defined as the outside edge of an area, the sharp end of something or to a point right before something happens.

An example of edge is the perimeter of the yard right before where you put your fence.

An example of edge is the area right before a cliff begins.

An example of edge is the sharp side of a knife.

An example of edge is the time right before you fall in love.

noun
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The quality of being edgy.
noun
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To make (one's way) sideways, as through a crowd.
verb
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To move gradually or cautiously.
verb
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A sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; an extreme verge.

The cup is right on the edge of the table.

He is standing on the edge of a precipice.

noun
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Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.
noun
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The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part; as, in the edge of evening.
noun
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(cricket) A shot where the ball comes off the edge of the bat, often unintentionally.
noun
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(usually in the form 'just edge') To win by a small margin.
verb
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Advantage.

You have an edge on me.

noun
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(1) The Web browser in Windows 10. See Edge browser.
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(intransitive) To move slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

He edged away from her.

verb
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(cricket) To hit the ball with an edge of the bat, causing a fine deflection.
verb
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To trim the margin of a lawn where the grass meets the sidewalk, usually with an electric or gas-powered lawn edger.
verb
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To furnish with an edge; to construct an edging.
verb
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To furnish with an edge, as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.
verb
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(figuratively) To make sharp or keen; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.
verb
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(intransitive) To delay one's orgasm so as to remain almost at the point of orgasm.
verb
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A margin of superiority; an advantage.

A slight edge over the opposition.

noun
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To advance or push slightly or gradually.

The dog edged the ball with its nose.

verb
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To trim or shape the edge of.

Edge a lawn.

verb
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To surpass or beat by a small margin. Often used with out:

The runner edged her opponent out at the last moment.

verb
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The part farthest from the middle; line where something begins or ends; border, or part nearest the border; margin.
noun
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The verge or brink, as of a condition.
noun
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A line or line segment at which two plane surfaces meet.
noun
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To defeat in a contest by a narrow margin.
verb
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To tilt (a ski) so that one edge bites into the snow, as in traversing a slope.
verb
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To move gradually or cautiously.

To edge away from danger.

verb
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Originally, Enhanced Data rates for Global Evolution.A 2.5G standard (1999) developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) as the final stage in the evolution of data communications within the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) standards. The only IMT-2000 specification based on time division multiple access (TDMA) rather than code division multiple access (CDMA), EDGE supports data transmission rates up to 473.6 kbps over GSM channels 200 kHz wide through an improved modulation technique known as 8-Phase Shift Keying (8-PSK), which involves eight levels of phase shift and, therefore, supports three bits per symbol. EDGE employs frequency division duplex (FDD) to support bidirectional communications over 124 channels, each of which supports 8 time slots. EDGE supports two modes of operation.
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(geometry) A one-dimensional face of a polytope. In particular, the joining line between two vertices of a polygon; the place where two faces of a polyhedron meet.
noun
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I have the edge on him.

noun
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(graph theory) A connected pair of vertices in a graph.
noun
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In male masturbation, a level of sexual arousal that is maintained just short of reaching the point of inevitability, or climax; see also edging.
noun
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To move an object slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

He edged the book across the table.

verb
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on edge
  • Highly tense or nervous; irritable.
idiom
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on the edge
  • In a precarious position.
  • In a state of keen excitement, as from danger or risk:.
idiom
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on edge
  • So tense or nervous as to be easily upset; irritable.
  • Eager; impatient.
idiom
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set someone's teeth on edge
  • To give a sensation of tingling discomfort, as the sound of a fingernail scraped on a slate does.
  • To irritate; provoke.
idiom
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take the edge off
  • To dull the intensity, force, or pleasure of.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

on the edge
set someone's teeth on edge

Origin of edge

  • Middle English egge from Old English ecg ak- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English egge, from Old English ecg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō (compare Dutch egge, German Ecke, Swedish egg), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (“sharp”) (compare Welsh hogi (“to sharpen, hone”), Latin aciēs (“sharp”), acus (“needle”), Latvian ašs, ass (“sharp”), Ancient Greek ἀκίς (akis, “needle”), ἀκμή (akmē, “point”), and Persian آس (ās, “grinding stone”)).

    From Wiktionary