Threshold meaning

thrĕshōld, -hōld
Frequency:
The entrance or beginning point of something.

At the threshold of a new career.

noun
12
3
The point where one mentally or physically is vulnerable in response to provocation or to particular things in general. As in emotions, stress, or pain.
noun
10
5
The place or point of beginning; the outset.

On the threshold of a new era.

noun
7
3
(by extension) An entrance.
noun
6
2
Any limit, quantity, etc. beyond someone's tolerance or at which something occurs.

A person with a low threshold for boredom.

noun
5
2
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The start of the landing area of a runway.
noun
5
2
The bottom-most part of a doorway that one crosses to enter; a sill.
noun
5
3
A piece of wood or stone placed beneath a door; a doorsill.
noun
3
4
The wage or salary at which income tax becomes due.
noun
2
1
The outset of an action or project.
noun
2
1
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(physiol., psychol.) The point at which a stimulus is just strong enough to be perceived or to produce a response.
noun
2
2
The point that must be exceeded to begin producing a given effect or result or to elicit a response.

A low threshold of pain.

noun
2
2
(1) The point at which a signal (voltage, current, etc.) is perceived as valid.
2
2
The point of beginning or entry.

From all the pressure my partner has been through lately, his emotion threshold has suddenly gotten pretty low these days. I can tell because he easily loses it when he is around people or hears about anything to do with his concerns.

noun
1
1
noun
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2
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(engineering) The quantitative point at which an action is triggered, especially a lower limit.
noun
1
2
The definition of a threshold is the entrance or start of something.

An example of threshold is the doorway of a house.

An example of threshold is the transition from high school to college.

noun
1
3
The point that must be exceeded to begin producing a given effect or result or to elicit a response.

A low threshold of pain.

noun
1
3
Either end of an airport runway.
noun
1
4

Origin of threshold

  • Middle English thresshold from Old English therscold, threscold terə-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English þrescold (“doorsill", "point of entering"), from þrescan (“tread", "trample")

    From Wiktionary