Horizon meaning

hə-rīzən
Frequency:
The definition of horizon is the area where the earth and sky look as if they come together or how far your interests and knowledge stretch.

An example of horizon is the area where the sky and earth appear to merge into one sea of blue.

An example of horizon is a person who has never travelled outside of his own town.

noun
14
5
(archaeology) A period during which the influence of a specified culture spread rapidly over a defined area.

Artifacts associated with the Olmec horizon in Mesoamerica.

noun
10
3
The range of one's knowledge, experience, or interest.
noun
8
1
(archaeol.) An archaeological level or an area of culture as indicated by surviving artifacts.
noun
6
1
The limit or extent of one's outlook, experience, interest, knowledge, etc.

Travel broadens one's horizons.

noun
5
1
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(archaeology) A period during which the influence of a particular culture spread rapidly over a defined area.
2
1
(geology) A specific layer of soil or strata.
noun
2
1
(astron.) The great circle on the celestial sphere perpendicular to the line from the observer's zenith to the nadir.
noun
1
1
(geol.) A layer of soil or rock identified by physical characteristics, particular fossils, etc.
noun
1
1
The horizontal line that appears to separate the Earth from the sky.

A tall building was visible on the horizon.

noun
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(archaeology, US) A cultural sub-period or level within a more encompassing time period.
noun
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1
The apparent intersection of the earth and sky as seen by an observer.
noun
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2
The range or limit of one's knowledge, experience or interest.

Some students take a gap year after finishing high school to broaden their horizons.

noun
0
3
on the horizon
  • in the foreseeable future; impending, looming, destined, etc.
idiom
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2

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of horizon

  • Middle English orizon from Old French from Latin horizōn from Greek horizōn (kuklos) limiting (circle), horizon present participle of horizein to limit from horos boundary

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French orizon, via Latin, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horizōn), from ὅρος (horos, “boundary”)

    From Wiktionary