Gate meaning

gāt
A mountain pass.
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The total paid attendance or admission receipts at a public event.

A good gate at the football game.

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A device for controlling the passage of water or gas through a dam or conduit.
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A movable framework or solid structure, esp. one that swings on hinges, controlling entrance or exit through an opening in a fence or wall.
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Any means of entrance, exit, or access; specif., any of the numbered areas at an airport terminal, typically including a waiting area, from which passengers board and exit an airplane.
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A structure controlling the flow of water, as in a pipe, canal, etc.
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The definition of a gate is a structure that can be opened to provide an entrance or an opening used for passage through a fence or wall.

An example of a gate is a side entrance to the back yard of a house.

An example of a gate is a hinged door in the middle of a picket fence.

An example of a gate is the access between an airplane and the airport terminal.

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A structure that can be swung, drawn, or lowered to block an entrance or a passageway.
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The channel through which molten metal flows into a shaped cavity of a mold.
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(sports) A passage between two upright poles through which a skier must go in a slalom race.
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(chiefly british) To confine (a student) to the grounds of a college as punishment.
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(electronics) To select part of (a wave) for transmission, reception, or processing by magnitude or time interval.
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To furnish with a gate.
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A scandal involving alleged illegal acts and often a cover-up, especially by government officials.

Irangate.

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An opening providing passageway through a fence or wall, with or without such a structure; gateway.
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A mountain pass.
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A movable barrier, as at a railroad crossing or for controlling the start of a horse race.
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A frame in which a saw or saws are set.
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In Alpine racing, an opening between two upright poles through which the skier must pass.
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(brit.) To confine (a student) to the college grounds.
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To furnish with a gate.
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(1) A switch that is opened or closed.
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Doorway, opening, or passage in a fence or wall.
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Movable barrier.

The gate in front of the railroad crossing went up after the train had passed.

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(computing) A logical pathway made up of switches which turn on or off. Examples are and, or, nand, etc.
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(cricket) The gap between a batsman's bat and pad.

Singh was bowled through the gate, a very disappointing way for a world-class batsman to get out.

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The amount of money made by selling tickets to a concert or a sports event.
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(flow cytometry) A line that separates particle type-clusters on two-dimensional dot plots.
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Passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark.
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(electronics) The controlling terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).
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In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.
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(metalworking) The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mould; the ingate.
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The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece. Also written geat and git.
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To keep something inside by means of a closed gate.
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To ground someone.
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(biochemistry) To open a closed ion channel.
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To furnish with a gate.
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To turn (an image intensifier) on and off selectively as needed, or to avoid damage. See autogating.
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(now Scotland, northern UK) A way, path.
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(Northern England) A street; now used especially as a combining form to make the name of a street.
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(UK, Scotland, dialect, archaic) Manner; gait.
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Combined with keywords to form the names of scandals.
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Used to form place names.
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A logic gate.
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A path or way.
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A particular way of acting or doing; manner.
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(slang) get the gate
  • To be dismissed or rejected.
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(slang) give (someone) the gate
  • To discharge from a job.
  • To reject or jilt.
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give (or get) the gate
  • to subject (or be subjected) to dismissal
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

get the gate
give (someone) the gate
give (<i>or</i> get) the gate

Origin of gate

  • Middle English from Old Norse gata ghē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English geat

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • After Watergate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English ġeat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą (“hole, opening”) (cf. Swedish/Dutch gat, Low German Gaat, Gööt), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰed-ye/o (“to defecate”) (cf. Albanian dhjes, Ancient Greek χέζω (khézō), Old Armenian ձետ (jet, “tail”), Avestan [script?] (zadah, “rump”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ. Cognate with Danish gade, Swedish gata, German Gasse (“lane”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Back-formation from Watergate.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English geat.

    From Wiktionary