Caisson meaning

kāsŏn, -sən
Frequency:
A watertight structure within which construction work is carried on under water.
noun
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1
A floating structure used to close off the entrance to a dock or canal lock.
noun
1
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(military) A two-wheeled, horse-drawn military vehicle used to carry ammunition (a coffin at funerals).
noun
1
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A large box open at the top and one side, designed to fit against the side of a ship and used to repair damaged hulls under water.
noun
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A chest for holding ammunition.
noun
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A two-wheeled wagon for transporting ammunition.
noun
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A watertight enclosure inside which underwater construction work can be done.
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A watertight box for raising sunken ships: after the box is sunk and attached, the water is forced out of it so that it floats.
noun
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A hollow, boat-shaped box, used as a floodgate at a dock or basin.
noun
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(engineering) An enclosure, from which water can be expelled, in order to give access to underwater areas for engineering works etc.
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The gate across the entrance to a dry dock.
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(nautical) A floating tank that can be submerged, attached to an underwater object and then pumped out to lift the object by buoyancy; a camel.
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(military) A large box to hold ammunition.
noun
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(architecture) A variant of coffer.
noun
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Origin of caisson

  • French from Old French large box alteration (influenced by caisse chest) of casson from Italian cassone augmentative of cassa box from Latin capsa

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from French caisson, from Italian cassone.

    From Wiktionary