Limber meaning

lĭmbər
A two-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle used to tow a field gun or a caisson.
noun
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Bending or flexing readily; pliable.
adjective
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Able to bend the body easily; supple; lithe.
adjective
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Capable of moving, bending, or contorting easily; supple.
adjective
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To make limber.

Limbered up his legs.

verb
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To make oneself limber.

Players limbering up before the game.

verb
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To make oneself limber, as by exercises.
verb
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The two-wheeled, detachable front part of a gun carriage, usually supporting an ammunition chest.
noun
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To cause to become limber; to make flexible or pliant.
verb
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(in the plural) The shafts or thills of a wagon or carriage.
noun
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(military) The detachable fore part of a gun carriage, consisting of two wheels, an axle, and a shaft to which the horses are attached. On top is an ammunition box upon which the cannoneers sit.
noun
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(nautical, in the plural) Gutters or conduits on each side of the keelson to allow water to pass to the pump well.
noun
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(obsolete) To prepare an artillery piece for transportation (i.e., to attach it to its limber.)
verb
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Easily bent; flexible; pliant.
adjective
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To make limber.

To limber the fingers.

verb
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To attach the limber to (a gun carriage), as in preparing to move off.
verb
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He's so limber that he can kiss his knee without bending it.

adjective
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Origin of limber

  • Alteration of Middle English limour shaft of a cart perhaps from limon from Old French

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • For the obsolete limmer, from Old Norse limar (“branches"), plural of lim.

    From Wiktionary