Limp definition

lĭmp
Lacking or having lost stiffness or body; flaccid, drooping, wilted, etc.
adjective
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The definition of limp is something that has lost stiffness or that is without energy and strength.

A person who lets all his muscles go slack is an example of a person who is limp.

Lettuce that is old and wilty is an example of lettuce that would be described as limp.

adjective
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To limp is defined as to walk with difficulty, often dragging at least one leg due to injury.

When you walk after you hurt your ankle and cannot put pressure on it, this is an example of a situation where you limp.

verb
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(intransitive) To happen; befall; chance.
verb
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To come upon; meet.
verb
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adjective
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Lacking stiffness; flimsy; as, a limp cravat.
adjective
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(of a penis) Not erect.
adjective
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(of a man) Not having an erect penis.
adjective
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Physically weak.
adjective
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(intransitive) To be inadequate or unsatisfactory.
verb
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A scraper of board or sheet-iron shaped like half the head of a small cask, used for scraping the ore off the sieve in the operation of hand-jigging.
noun
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(intransitive) To walk lamely, as if favouring one leg.
verb
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(intransitive, figuratively, of a vehicle) To travel with a malfunctioning system of propulsion.

The bomber limped home on one engine.

verb
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(poker slang, intransitive) To call.
verb
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noun
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A scraper for removing poor ore or refuse from the sieve.
noun
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A code-word among Jacobites, standing for Louis XIV, James II, Queen Mary of Modena and the Prince of Wales.
noun
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To walk lamely, especially with irregularity, as if favoring one leg.
verb
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1
To move or proceed haltingly or unsteadily.

The project limped along with half its previous funding.

verb
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An irregular, jerky, or awkward gait.
noun
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1
Lacking strength, vigor, or effectiveness; weak.

Limp political opposition.

adjective
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To walk with or as with a lame or partially disabled leg or foot.
verb
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To move or proceed unevenly, jerkily, or laboriously, as because of being impaired, defective, damaged, etc.
verb
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A halting gait or lameness in walking.
noun
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1
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Lacking firmness, energy, or vigor.
adjective
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Flexible, as the binding of some books.
adjective
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Lacking or having lost rigidity, as of structure or substance.

Limp, wet hair; an arm hanging limp over the side of the bed.

adjective
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
limp
Plural:
limps

Adjective

Base Form:
limp
Comparative:
limper
Superlative:
limpest

Origin of limp

  • Probably from obsolete lymphault lame from Old English lemphealt lemp- hanging loosely -healt lame, limping

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English limpen, from Old English limpan (“to happen, occur, exist, belong to, suit, befit, concern"), from Proto-Germanic *limpanÄ… (“to glide, go, suit"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lemb-, *(s)lembÊ°- (“to hang loosely, hang limply"). Cognate with Scots limp (“to chance to be, come"), Middle Low German gelimpen (“to moderate, treat mildly"), Middle High German limfen (“to suit, become").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *limp, *lemp, from Old English *lemp (found only in compound lemphealt (“limping"), from Proto-Germanic *limpanÄ… (“to hang down"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lemb-, *(s)lembÊ°- (“to hang loosely, hang limply"). Cognate with German lampecht (“flaccid, limp"), Icelandic lempinn, lempiligur (“pliable, gentle"). See above.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *limpen, from Old English *limpan, *lympan, from Proto-Germanic *limpanÄ… (“to hang down"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lemb-, *(s)lembÊ°- (“to hang loosely, hang limply"). Cognate with Low German lumpen (“to limp"), German dialectal lampen (“to hang down loosely"), Icelandic limpa (“limpness, weakness").

    From Wiktionary