Hard Definition

härd
harder, hardest
adjective
harder, hardest
Not easily dented, pierced, cut, or crushed; resistant to pressure; firm and unyielding to the touch; rigid; solid and compact.
Webster's New World
Having firm muscles; in good bodily trim; vigorous and robust.
Webster's New World
Well protected from an attack, as by aerial bombardment.
Bunkers and other hard targets.
American Heritage
Showing, or done with, great force or strength; powerful; violent; vigorous.
A hard blow.
Webster's New World
Demanding great physical or mental effort or labor; fatiguing; difficult.
Webster's New World
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adverb
With strenuous effort; intently.
Worked hard all day; stared hard at the accused criminal.
American Heritage
Energetically and persistently; steadily and earnestly.
Work hard.
Webster's New World
With strength, violence, or severity.
Hit hard.
Webster's New World
In such a way as to cause great damage or hardship.
Industrial cities hit hard by unemployment.
American Heritage
With difficulty.
Hard-earned, hard-sought.
Webster's New World
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(of roads): soft.
Wiktionary

("sexually aroused"): soft, flaccid.

Wiktionary
noun

(nautical) A firm or paved beach or slope convenient for hauling vessels out of the water.

Wiktionary
idiom
hard and fast
  • Defined, fixed, and invariable:

    hard and fast rules.

American Heritage
hard of hearing
  • Having a partial loss of hearing.
  • People who have partial loss of hearing, considered as a group.
American Heritage
hard put
  • Undergoing great difficulty:

    Under the circumstances, he was hard put to explain himself.

American Heritage
hard up
  • In need; poor.
American Heritage
be hard on
  • to treat severely; be harsh toward
  • to be difficult, unpleasant, or painful for
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Hard

Noun

Singular:
hard
Plural:
hards

Adjective

Base Form:
hard
Comparative:
harder
Superlative:
hardest

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Hard

Origin of Hard

  • From Middle English, from Old English heard (“hard”), from Proto-Germanic *harduz, from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (“strong; powerful”). Cognate with West Frisian hurd, Dutch hard, Low German hard, hart, German hart, Danish hård.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old English heard kar- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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