Beach meaning

bēch
The zone above the water line at a shore of a body of water, marked by an accumulation of sand, stone, or gravel that has been deposited by the tide or waves.
noun
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The shore of a body of water, especially when sandy or pebbly.
noun
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The shore of a body of water, especially when sandy or pebbly.
noun
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To ground (a boat, whale, etc.) on or as if on a beach.
verb
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The definition of a beach is the area directly touching a seashore.

Copocabana and Waikiki are each an example of a beach.

noun
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To run or be hauled ashore.

We beached near the palm trees.

verb
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The sand or pebbles on a shore.
noun
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To be stranded on a beach. Used of sea animals.
verb
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A nearly level stretch of pebbles and sand beside a sea, lake, etc., often washed by high water; sandy shore; strand.
noun
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Appropriate for the beach or sunbathing; specif., designating or of a novel, etc. regarded as entertaining and easy to read.
adjective
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The area of accumulated sand, stone, or gravel deposited along a shore by the action of waves and tides. Beaches usually slope gently toward the body of water they border and have a concave shape. They extend landward from the low water line to the point where there is a distinct change in material (as in a line of vegetation) or in land features (as in a cliff).
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A horizontal strip of land, usually sandy, adjoining water.
noun
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(UK dialectal, Sussex, Kent) The loose pebbles of the seashore, especially worn by waves; shingle.
noun
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To run (something) aground on a beach.
verb
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To run, haul, or bring ashore.

Beached the rowboat in front of the cabin; hooked a big bluefish but was unable to beach it.

verb
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To cause (a whale or other sea animal) to be unable to swim free from a beach.
verb
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An area of shore as a place for swimming, sunbathing, etc.
noun
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Origin of beach

  • Perhaps Middle English beche stream from Old English bece

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bache, bæcche (“bank, sandbank”), from Old English bæċe, beċe (“beck, brook, stream”), from Proto-Germanic *bakiz (“brook”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰog- (“flowing water”). Cognate with Dutch beek (“brook, stream”), German Bach (“brook, stream”), Swedish bäck (“stream, brook, creek”). More at batch, beck.

    From Wiktionary