Moor meaning

mo͝or
Moor is defined as a large open marsh land.

An example of moor is an expanse between two farm houses that doesn't drain well.

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Moor means to secure something in place.

An example of moor is dropping an anchor off the side of a boat.

verb
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The definition of a moor is a member of a Muslim people of Berber and Arab descent living in Northwest Africa.

An example of moor is the hero Othello in Shakespeare's play.

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(archaic) A Muslim or a person from the Middle East or Africa.
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To make fast (a vessel, for example) by means of cables, anchors, or lines.

Moor a ship to a dock; a dirigible moored to a tower.

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(historical) A member of an ancient Berber people from Numidia.
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(historical) A member of an Islamic people of Arab or Berber origin ruling Spain and parts of North Africa from the 8th to the 15th centuries.
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(dated) A person of mixed Arab and Berber ancestry inhabiting the Mediterranean coastline of northwest Africa.
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A person of an ethnic group speaking the Hassaniya language, mainly inhabiting Western Sahara, Mauritania, and parts of neighbouring countries (Morocco, Mali, Senegal etc.).
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Alternative spelling of More.
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To fix in place; secure.

A mailbox moored to the sidewalk with bolts.

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To provide with an abiding emotional attachment.

A politician moored to the family back home.

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To secure a vessel or aircraft with lines or anchors.
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To be secured with lines or anchors.

The freighter moored alongside the wharf.

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An uncultivated area covered with low-growing vegetation and often high but poorly drained.
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A member of a traditionally Muslim people of mixed Berber and Arab ancestry, now living chiefly in northwest Africa.
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One of the Muslims who invaded Spain in the 8th century and established a civilization in Andalusia that lasted until the late 15th century.
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A tract of open, rolling wasteland, usually covered with heather and often marshy or peaty; heath.
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A tract of land with game preserves.
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To hold (a ship, etc.) in place by cables or chains attached as to a pier or special buoy (mooring buoy), or by two anchors.
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To cause to be held in place; secure.
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To moor a ship, etc.
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To be secured as by cables.
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A member of a Muslim people of mixed Arab and Berber descent living in NW Africa.
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A member of a group from this people that invaded and occupied Spain in the 8th cent. a.d.
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An extensive waste covered with patches of heath, and having a poor, light soil, but sometimes marshy, and abounding in peat; a heath.

A cold, biting wind blew across the moor, and the travellers hastened their step.

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A game preserve consisting of moorland.
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(intransitive) To cast anchor or become fastened.
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(nautical) To fix or secure, as a vessel, in a particular place by casting anchor, or by fastening with cables or chains; as, the vessel was moored in the stream; they moored the boat to the wharf.
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Origin of moor

  • Middle English More from Old French from Medieval Latin Mōrus from Latin Maurus Mauritanian from Greek Mauros
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English mor from Old English mōr
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English moren
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French More, Maure, from Latin Maurus (“a Moor, meaning a Mauritanian, an inhabitant of Mauritania"), possibly from Ancient Greek Μαῦρος (Mauros), μαυρός (mauros, “black, dark"), an aphetic form of ἀμαυρός (amauros, “dark, obscure")
    From Wiktionary
  • From the imperfect past participle moored; present participle and verbal noun mooring. Probably from middle Dutch marren "to tie, fasten or moor a ship" (now only means to procrastinate; > modern terms (aan)meren). See mar.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English mōr. Cognates include Dutch moer, German Moor and perhaps also Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐍂𐌴𐌹 (marei). See mere.
    From Wiktionary