Cable meaning

kābəl
To supply or fasten with a cable or cables.
verb
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To send a cablegram.
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The definition of cable means a rope-like bunch of wires used to connect two things.

The cord that connects your phone to the wall socket is an example of a cable.

The connection between your computer and your internet service provider is an example of a cable.

noun
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Of or relating to a subscription television or Internet service that uses cables to carry signals between local distribution antennas and the subscriber's location.
adjective
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A cablegram.
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A thick, heavy rope, now often of wire strands.
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The strong, heavy chain attached to a ship's anchor: anchor cables were formerly of rope.
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A bundle of insulated wires through which an electric current can be passed: telegraph or telephone cables are often laid under the ground or on the ocean floor.
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A cablegram.
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noun
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To fasten or furnish with a cable or cables.
verb
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To transmit by undersea cable.
verb
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To send a cablegram to.
verb
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To send a cablegram.
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(person) 1844-1925; U.S. novelist.
proper name
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A flexible metal or glass wire or group of wires. All cables used in electronics are insulated with a material such as plastic or rubber. See cable TV, cable categories, cable modem and set-top box.
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The exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the British pound sterling. The rate was transmitted over the transatlantic cable from 1866, and the initial novelty of the communication method gave the exchange rate this name. Cable also refers to sending a message electronically or transferring funds.
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A group or bundle of conductors, fibers, or wires, or bound together, sharing a common protective sheath or jacket, and perhaps strength members and shielding. See also aerial cable, direct bury cable, submarine cable, and underground cable. See also conductor, fiber, and wire.
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(material) A long object used to make a physical connection.
  • A strong, large-diameter wire or rope, or something resembling such a rope.
  • An assembly of two or more cable-laid ropes.
  • An assembly of two or more wires, used for electrical power or data circuits; one or more and/or the whole may be insulated.
  • (nautical) A heavy rope or chain of at least 10 inches thick, as used to moor or anchor a ship.
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(communications) A system for transmitting television or Internet services over a network of coaxial or fibreoptic cables.
  • Short for cable television, broadcast over the above network, not by antenna.

I tried to watch the movie last night but my cable was out.

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A telegram, notably when sent by (submarine) telegraph cable.
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(nautical) A unit of length equal to one tenth of a nautical mile.
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(architecture) A moulding, shaft of a column, or any other member of convex, rounded section, made to resemble the spiral twist of a rope.
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To provide with cable(s)
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To fasten (as if) with cable(s)
verb
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To wrap wires to form a cable.
verb
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To send a telegram by cable.
verb
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(intransitive) To communicate by cable.
verb
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(architecture) To ornament with cabling.
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(finance) The currency pair British Pound against United States Dollar.
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Origin of cable

  • Middle English from Old North French from Late Latin capulum lasso from Latin capere to seize kap- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Recorded since c.1205, from Old Northern French, from Medieval Latin capulum (“lasso, rope, halter”), from Latin capiō (“to take, seize”).

    From Wiktionary