Wire meaning

wīr
Wire is metal that is in very thin threads or rods, or something made of such a substance, or is slang for a hidden recording device.

An example of wire is a thin round thread used to make a netting.

An example of wire is a telephone cable.

An example of a wire is a microphone hidden in a shirt of an undercover police officer.

noun
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To send a telegram.
verb
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(computers) To implement (a capability) through logic circuitry that is permanently connected within a computer or calculator and therefore not subject to change by programming.
verb
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The definition of wire is made of metal in long, thin rods or threads.

An example of wire used as an adjective is in the phrase "wire fence," which means a fence made of such material.

adjective
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A pin in the print head of a computer printer.
noun
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(sports) The finish line of a racetrack.
noun
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(slang) A pickpocket.
noun
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(slang) A hidden microphone, as on a person's body or in a building.
noun
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The screen on which sheets of paper are formed in a papermaking machine.
noun
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(slang) To install electronic eavesdropping equipment in (a room, for example).
verb
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To determine genetically; hardwire.
verb
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Metal that has been drawn into a very long, thin thread or rod, usually circular in cross section.
noun
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A length of this, used for various purposes, such as conducting electric current or stringing musical instruments.
noun
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Wire netting or other wirework.
noun
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Anything made of wire or wirework, as a telephone cable, a barbed-wire fence, or a snare.
noun
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(informal) A concealed microphone or recording device, carried or worn as for espionage or by undercover police.
noun
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(horse racing) A wire above the finish line of a race.
noun
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Made of wire or wirework.
adjective
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To furnish, connect, bind, attach, string, etc. with a wire or wires.
verb
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To supply with a system of wires for electric current.
verb
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To telegraph.
verb
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(archaic) To snare with a wire or wires.
verb
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To telegraph.
verb
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Generally refers to the physical cabling in a network. "Over the wire" means transmitting the signals onto the physical medium. Increasingly, the wire is no longer metal, but glass.
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A current-carrying metal conductor, generally encased in a dielectric insulating material. A solid core conductor comprises a single wire. A stranded conductor comprises a number (usually 7 or 17, because they pack neatly) of small wires.Telecommunications wires generally are made of copper to conduct electrical current, although tinned copper, copper-clad aluminum, and other metals and metal combinations also can be used. Stranded, rather than solid core, conductors are used in applications requiring high flex strength. The wires generally are separately insulated with polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), flouropolymer resin,Teflon, or some other low-smoke, fire-retardant, dielectric material.Two wires then typically are twisted in a helix with a constant pitch or distance to make a 360-degree twist to form a twisted pair. One or more pairs then are formed into a cable, which is covered in a protective sheath of dielectric material. See also cable, conductor, current, dielectric, flex strength, insulation, and twisted pair.
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(uncountable) Metal formed into a thin, even thread, now usually by being drawn through a hole in a steel die.
noun
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A piece of such material; a thread or slender rod of metal, a cable.
noun
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A metal conductor that carries electricity.
noun
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A fence made of usually barbed wire.
noun
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(sports) A finish line of a racetrack.
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(informal) A telecommunication wire or cable; hence, an electric telegraph; a telegram.
noun
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(slang) A hidden listening device on the person of an undercover operative for the purposes of obtaining incriminating spoken evidence.
noun
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(informal) A deadline or critical endpoint.

This election is going to go right to the wire.

noun
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(billiards) A wire strung with beads and hung horizontally above or near the table which is used to keep score.
noun
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To fasten with wire, especially with reference to wine bottles, corks, or fencing.

We need to wire that hole in the fence.

verb
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To string on a wire.

Wire beads.

verb
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To equip with wires for use with electricity.
verb
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To add something into an electrical system by means of wiring; to incorporate or include something.

I'll just wire your camera to the computer screen.

verb
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(informal) To send a message or a money value to another person through a telecommunications system, formerly predominately by telegraph.

Urgent: please wire me another 100 pounds sterling.

verb
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To make someone tense or psyched up.

I'm never going to sleep: I'm completely wired from all that coffee.

verb
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(slang) To install eavesdropping equipment.

We wired the suspect's house.

verb
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To snare by means of a wire or wires.
verb
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(informal) down to the wire
  • To the very end, as in a race or contest.
idiom
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under the wire
  • At the finish line.
  • Just in the nick of time; at the last moment.
idiom
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down to the wire
  • to the very end or the very last moments
idiom
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pull wires
  • to use private influence to achieve a purpose
idiom
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(get in) under the wire
  • (to arrive or accomplish something) barely on time or at the last minute
idiom
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(from) wire to wire
  • from start to finish
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

pull wires
(get in) under the wire
(from) wire to wire

Origin of wire

  • Middle English from Old English wīr wei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English wir, wyr, from Old English wÄ«r (“wire, metal thread, wire-ornament"), from Proto-Germanic *wÄ«raz (“wire"), from Proto-Indo-European *weyro- (“a twist, thread, cord, wire"), from Proto-Indo-European *wey- (“to turn, twist, weave, plait"). Cognate with Low German Wir (“wire"), German Wiere (“wire, metallic thread"), Icelandic vír (“wire"), Swedish vira (“to twist"), Latin vieō (“weave together"), Welsh gwyr ('bent'), and Greek ίρις ('rainbow').

    From Wiktionary