File meaning

fīl
File means to put important papers away in an orderly way.

An example of to file is arranging papers in a cabinet in alphabetical order.

verb
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(computers) A collection of data or program records stored as a unit with a single name.
noun
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A collection of papers or published materials kept or arranged in convenient order.
noun
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The definition of a file is a container into which important papers are arranged so they are easy to find in the future.

An example of a file is a cabinet with drawers and folders for papers.

noun
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To file is defined as to start the process of a legal action, to register or to put something on public record.

An example of to file is a husband submitting the paperwork to the court to start the process of divorcing his wife.

verb
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(archaic) A list or roll.
noun
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To put items in a file.
verb
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A container, such as a cabinet or folder, for keeping papers in order.
noun
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To make application; apply.

Filed for a job with the state; file for a divorce.

verb
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A container, such as a cabinet or folder, for keeping papers in order.
noun
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To put or keep (papers, for example) in useful order for storage or reference.
verb
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To enter (a legal document) as an official record.
verb
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To send or submit (copy) to a newspaper.
verb
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To initiate (a lawsuit).

File a complaint; file charges.

verb
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To enter one's name in a political contest.

Filed for Congress.

verb
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(games) Any of the rows of squares that run forward and backward between players on a playing board in chess or checkers.
noun
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(archaic) A list or roll.
noun
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To put or keep (papers, for example) in useful order for storage or reference.
verb
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To enter (a legal document) as an official record.
verb
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To send or submit (copy) to a newspaper.
verb
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To initiate (a lawsuit).

File a complaint; file charges.

verb
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To march or walk in a line.
verb
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To put items in a file.
verb
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To make application; apply.

Filed for a job with the state; file for a divorce.

verb
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To enter one's name in a political contest.

Filed for Congress.

verb
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Any of several hardened steel tools with cutting ridges for forming, smoothing, or reducing especially metallic surfaces.
noun
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A nail file.
noun
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(chiefly british) A crafty or artful person.
noun
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To smooth, reduce, or remove with or as if with a file.
verb
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To sully or defile.
verb
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Powdered sassafras leaves used to thicken and season soups, stews, and gumbos.
noun
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To dispatch (a news story) to a newspaper, news agency, etc.
verb
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To register (an application, etc.)
verb
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To put (a document) on public record, esp. as required by law.
verb
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To initiate (a divorce suit or other legal action)
verb
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To move in a line.

To file out of a building.

verb
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To register oneself as a candidate (for a political office)
verb
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To make application (for divorce proceedings, etc.)
verb
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A container, as a folder, cabinet, etc., for keeping papers in order.
noun
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An orderly arrangement of papers, cards, etc., as for reference.
noun
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A line of persons or things situated one behind another.
noun
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Any of the rows of squares on a chessboard extending from one player's end to the other.
noun
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(comput.) A collection of data (or, often, of logically related records) stored and dealt with as a single, named unit.
noun
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A steel tool with a rough, ridged surface for smoothing, grinding down, or cutting through something.
noun
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(brit., slang) A crafty rascal.
noun
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To smooth, grind down, or cut through as with a file.
verb
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(archaic) To make foul; defile.
verb
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Powdered sassafras leaves, used in Creole cooking.
noun
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A collection of related data or program records stored as a unit with a single name. Files are the basic units that a computer works with in storing and retrieving data.
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A collection of bytes stored as an individual entity on the computer's hard drive or SSD. A file is the common denominator of storage. All data and programs, no matter which kind, are stored as files with an assigned file name that must be unique within the storage folder (directory) it resides in. Files with the same name can reside in separate folders. See folder.Computers Know Nothing About Data FilesTo the computer, a data file is nothing more than a string of bytes that is identified by name and location in storage. Once read into the computer's RAM, the structure of a file is known to the software that manipulates it. For example, database files are made up of a series of records such as one per customer, vendor or transaction. Word processing files contain a continuous flow of text interspersed with format codes (tags).Except for ASCII text files, which contain only raw text, all other data files have proprietary structures. Formatting and descriptive information are contained in headers at the beginning of the file and/or in tags interspersed throughout the file. XML is an example of a very popular tagged text file. See metadata and XML.Computers Are Savvy About Program FilesIn contrast to data files, the computer itself is inherently aware of the content of an executable program file, which contains machine instructions. When given the starting point of an instruction in RAM, the computer expects to find the bytes in a format it recognizes and can execute, one instruction after the other (see machine language).File ContentsFollowing are the major file types and the data structures they contain. See file association, ASCII file, file system and files vs. folders.DataFile Type Contents data file text & binary (table) (rows/records) document text & format codes spreadsheet rows/columns of cells image rows/columns of pixels drawing list of vectors CD audio digitized sound waves compressed audio (MP3, compressed digitized AAC, etc.) sound waves MIDI MIDI instructions video digital video frames Web page text, HTML tags & (HTML file) JavaScript XML file text batch file text text file text SoftwareFile Type Contents source code text intermediate language binary (bytecode) executable binary program (machine language)
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A court’s or a lawyer’s record of a case.
noun
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V. The act of submitting a document, generally to a court.
noun
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Program file. An electronic file containing commands and instructions for execution by a computer. See also program file.
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Data file. An electronic file containing the work created with a program. See also data file and data set.
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A collection of papers collated and archived together.
noun
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A roll or list.
noun
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Course of thought; thread of narration.
noun
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(computing) An aggregation of data on a storage device, identified by a name.

I'm going to delete these unwanted files to free up some disk space.

noun
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To commit official papers to some office.
verb
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To place in an archive in a logical place and order.
verb
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To store a file (aggregation of data) on a storage medium such as a disc or another computer.
verb
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(intransitive, with for, chiefly law) To make a formal request for the benefit of an official status.

She filed for divorce the next day.

The company filed for bankruptcy when the office opened on Monday.

They filed for a refund under their warranty.

verb
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A column of people one behind another, whether "single file" or in a large group with many files side by side.

The troops marched in Indian file.

noun
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(chess) One of the eight vertical lines of squares on a chessboard (i.e., those which run from number to number). The analog horizontal lines are the ranks.
noun
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(intransitive) To move in a file.

The applicants kept filing into the room until it was full.

verb
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A hand tool consisting of a handle to which a block of coarse metal is attached, and used for removing sharp edges or for cutting, especially through metal.
noun
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(slang, archaic) A cunning or resourceful person.

noun
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To smooth, grind, or cut with a file.

I'd better file the bottoms of the table legs. Otherwise they will scratch the flooring.

verb
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(archaic) To defile.
verb
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verb
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(games) Any of the rows of squares that run forward and backward between players on a playing board in chess or checkers.
noun
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To march or walk in a line.
verb
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A collection of papers or published materials kept or arranged in convenient order.
noun
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1
(computers) A collection of data or program records stored as a unit with a single name.
noun
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on file
  • In or as if in a file for easy reference:
    We will keep your résumé on file.
idiom
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on file
  • In or as if in a file for easy reference:
    We will keep your résumé on file.
idiom
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in file
  • in line, one behind another
idiom
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on file
  • (kept) in or as in a file for reference
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of file

  • From Middle English filen to put documents on file from Old French filer to spin thread, to put documents on a thread from Late Latin fīlāre to spin, draw out in a long line from Latin fīlum thread gwhī- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English filen to put documents on file from Old French filer to spin thread, to put documents on a thread from Late Latin fīlāre to spin, draw out in a long line from Latin fīlum thread gwhī- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Louisiana French from French past participle of filer to spin thread (from its effect when added to hot liquids) from Old French file1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English filen from Old English fȳlan pū̆- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English fīl peig- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English filen (“to defile”), from Old English fȳlan (“to defile, make foul”), from fūl (“foul”). More at defile.

    From Wiktionary

  • French file, from filer, “to spin out”, “arrange one behind another”, Latin fīlāre, from filum, “thread”.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English feol. Cognate with Dutch vijl, German Feile, West Frisian file.

    From Wiktionary

  • French fil (“thread”), Latin filum (“thread”).

    From Wiktionary