Telegraph definition

tĕlĭ-grăf
A message transmitted by telegraph; a telegram.
noun
15
7
To transmit (a message) by telegraph.
verb
10
7
(obs.) Any signaling apparatus.
noun
9
7
To telegraph is to send someone a message electronically, or to convey a message using body language or other non-verbal cues.

When you send someone a message using a wire service, this is an example of a situation where you telegraph the person.

When you frown to signify disapproval, this is an example of a situation where you telegraph your disapproval.

verb
2
0
To send a telegram.
verb
2
1
Advertisement
To make known (an intended action, for example) in advance or unintentionally.

By massing troops on the border, the enemy telegraphed its intended invasion to the target country.

verb
1
0
From the Greek tele, meaning far off, and graphos, meaning written. See also Hellenologophobia. 1. An apparatus or process for communicating information over a distance by coded signals. Simple telegraphs employ smoke signals, drums, mirrors, flags, fires, lanterns, and mechanical semaphores. 2. The electric telegraph was invented by Samuel F.B. Morse (1791
1
0
To give nonverbal signals to another, as with gestures or a change in attitude.

Her frown telegraphed her displeasure.

verb
1
0
To show one's intended action unintentionally.
verb
1
0
The definition of a telegraph is an old-fashioned method of sending messages along a wire service by converting a message into electronic impulses.

A system that sends messages via wire, computer and satellites is an example of a telegraph.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
To make known (a feeling or an attitude, for example) by nonverbal means.

Telegraphed her derision with a smirk.

verb
0
0
To send or transmit a telegram.
verb
0
0
(informal) To signal (an intended action, decision, etc.) unintentionally to another, as by a gesture or look.
verb
0
0
A communications system in which a message in the form of short, rapid electric impulses is sent, either by wire or radio, to a receiving station. Morse code is often used to encode messages in a form that is easily transmitted through electric impulses.
0
0
(historical) An apparatus, or a process, for communicating rapidly between distant points, especially by means of established visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical means.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To send a message by telegraph.
verb
0
0
To send a telegram to.
verb
5
6
An apparatus or system that converts a coded message into electric impulses and sends it to a distant receiver: originally, Morse code signals were sent using a key that opened and closed the circuit to activate an electromagnetic sounder, but now teletypewriters, computers, radio and microwave signals, satellites, and lasers are used.
noun
4
5
A communications system that transmits and receives simple unmodulated electric impulses, especially one in which the transmission and reception stations are directly connected by wires.
noun
0
1
To send or convey a message to (a recipient) by telegraph.
verb
0
1
Advertisement
To send (a message) by telegraph.
verb
0
1

Origin of telegraph

  • From French télégraphe.

    From Wiktionary