Distant meaning

dĭs'tənt
Widely separated; far apart or far away in space or time.
adjective
3
0
At a measured interval; away.

A town 100 miles distant.

adjective
3
0
The definition of distant is separated, far away or not immediately connected.

An example of distant used as an adjective is in the phrase "distant cousin," which means a person who is not a first cousin, but is a second, third, etc. cousin.

adjective
3
1
Far removed or apart in time.

The distant past; distant events.

adjective
3
1
Far apart in relationship.

A distant cousin.

adjective
3
1
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Far off (physically, logically or mentally).

We heard a distant rumbling but didn't pay any more attention to it. She was surprised to find that her fiancé was a distant relative of hers. His distant look showed that he was not listening to me.

adjective
2
0
Far removed mentally.

Distant thoughts.

adjective
2
1
Aloof or chilly.

A distant smile.

adjective
2
1
Far apart in relationship; remote.

A distant cousin.

adjective
1
0
Cool in manner; aloof; reserved.
adjective
1
0
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From or at a distance.

A distant sound.

adjective
1
0
Faraway or dreamy.

A distant look.

adjective
1
0

Ever since the trauma she has been totally distant to me.

adjective
1
0
Minimally similar.

A distant likeness.

adjective
1
1
Having a gap or space between; separated.
adjective
1
1
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Coming from or going to a distance.

A distant sound; a distant telephone call.

adjective
0
0

Origin of distant

  • Middle English distaunt from Old French from Latin distāns distant- present participle of distāre to be remote dis- apart dis– stāre to stand stā- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin distans, present participle of distare (“to stand apart, be separate, distant, or different”), from di-, dis- (“apart”) + stare (“to stand”).
    From Wiktionary