Cold meaning

kōld
Frequency:
Feeling chilled.
adjective
10
4
Without warmth of feeling; unfeeling; indifferent.

A cold personality.

adjective
7
3
With complete finality.

We turned him down cold.

adverb
5
0
Characterized by repeated failure, especially in a sport or competitive activity.

The team fell into a slump of cold shooting.

adjective
5
1
Cold weather.
noun
5
3
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A condition of low air temperature; cold weather.

Went out into the cold and got a chill.

noun
3
0
Of a temperature significantly or noticeably lower than average, normal, expected, or comfortable; very chilly; frigid.

A cold wind.

adjective
3
0
A contagious, viral infection of the respiratory passages, esp. of the nose and throat, characterized by an acute inflammation of the mucous membranes, nasal discharge, malaise, etc.
noun
3
0
Without advance preparation or introduction.

Took the exam cold and passed; walked in cold and got the new job.

adverb
2
0
A viral infection characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the upper respiratory passages and usually accompanied by malaise, fever, chills, coughing, and sneezing.
noun
2
0
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Dead.
adjective
1
0
Not cordial or kind; unfriendly.

A cold reception.

adjective
1
0
Sexually frigid.
adjective
1
0
Depressing or saddening; gloomy.

To realize the cold truth.

adjective
1
0
Not involving one's feelings; detached; objective.

Cold logic.

adjective
1
0
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Designating or having colors that suggest cold, as tones of blue, green, or gray.
adjective
1
0
Still far from what is being sought.
adjective
1
0
Not strong or fresh; faint or stale.

Dogs tracking a cold scent.

adjective
1
0
No longer providing new or useful information, clues, etc.

Following a cold paper trail.

adjective
1
0
(informal) Unconscious.

The boxer was knocked cold.

adjective
1
0
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(informal) Unlucky or ineffective.

A cold streak in baseball.

adjective
1
0
Absolutely; completely.

She was stopped cold.

adverb
1
0
With complete mastery.

The actor had the lines down cold.

adverb
1
0
With little or no preparation.

To enter a game cold.

adverb
1
0
The sensation produced by a loss or absence of heat.
noun
1
0
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A condition of low air temperature; cold weather.

Went out into the cold and got a chill.

noun
1
0
(1) Inactive; unused; idle. See cold backup, cold boot and cold swap.
1
0
(of a thing) Having a low temperature.

A cold wind whistled through the trees.

adjective
1
0
A viral infection characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the upper respiratory passages and usually accompanied by malaise, fever, chills, coughing, and sneezing.
noun
0
0
(of the weather) Causing the air to be cold.

The forecast is that it will be very cold today.

adjective
0
0
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(of a person or animal) Feeling the sensation of coldness, especially to the point of discomfort.

She was so cold she was shivering.

adjective
0
0
Unfriendly, emotionally distant or unfeeling.

She shot me a cold glance before turning her back.

adjective
0
0

Let's look at this tomorrow with a cold head.

He's a nice guy, but the cold facts say we should fire him.

The cold truth is that states rarely undertake military action unless their national interests are at stake.

adjective
0
0
Completely unprepared; without introduction.

He was assigned cold calls for the first three months.

adjective
0
0
Unconscious or deeply asleep; deprived of the metaphorical heat associated with life or consciousness.

I knocked him out cold.

After one more beer he passed out cold.

adjective
0
0
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(usually with "have" or "know" transitively) Perfectly, exactly, completely; by heart.

Practice your music scales until you know them cold.

Try both these maneuvers until you have them cold and can do them in the dark without thinking.

Rehearse your lines until you have them down cold.

Keep that list in front of you, or memorize it cold.

adjective
0
0
(usually with "have" transitively) Cornered, done for.

With that receipt, we have them cold for fraud.

Criminal interrogation. Initially they will dream up explanations faster than you could ever do so, but when they become fatigued, often they will acknowledge that you have them cold.

adjective
0
0
Addison.

The jest grows cold […] when it comes on in a second scene.

adjective
0
0
Affecting the sense of smell (as of hunting dogs) only feebly; having lost its odour.

A cold scent.

adjective
0
0
Distant; said, in the game of hunting for some object, of a seeker remote from the thing concealed. Compare warm and hot.

You're cold... getting warmer... hot! You've found it!

adjective
0
0
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(painting) Having a bluish effect; not warm in colour.
adjective
0
0
A condition of low temperature.

Come in, out of the cold.

noun
0
0
(medicine) A common, usually harmless, viral illness, usually with congestion of the nasal passages and sometimes fever.

I caught a miserable cold and had to stay home for a week.

noun
0
0
While at low temperature.

The steel was processed cold.

adverb
0
0
Without preparation.

The speaker went in cold and floundered for a topic.

adverb
0
0
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With finality.

I knocked him out cold.

adverb
0
0
The definition of cold is a low temperature or is someone who is not warm and friendly.

An example of cold is 32 degree weather.

An example of cold is a person who doesn't ever say hello or make you feel welcome or comfortable.

adjective
0
1
Cold is defined as a contagious virus that causes you to have a stuffy nose and sometimes a sore throat and a fever.

An example of a cold is an illness where you are sneezing and coughing and have a runny nose for a day or two as a result of a virus.

noun
0
1
Lacking emotion; objective.

Cold logic.

adjective
0
1
Having lost all freshness or vividness through passage of time.

Dogs attempting to catch a cold scent.

adjective
0
1
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So intense as to be almost uncontrollable.

Cold fury.

adjective
0
1
To an unqualified degree; totally.

Was cold sober.

adverb
0
1
out in the cold
  • Lacking benefits given to others; neglected.
idiom
0
0
catch cold
  • to become ill with a cold
idiom
0
0
cold comfort
  • little or no comfort at all
idiom
0
0
come in from the cold
  • to come out of exile, isolation, etc.; resume an active role
idiom
0
0
leave someone cold
  • to fail to arouse someone's interest
idiom
0
0
have (or get) cold feet
  • to lose courage or resolve as the time of a planned action or event approaches
idiom
0
0
in the cold
  • ignored; neglected
idiom
0
0
throw cold water on
  • to be unenthusiastic about or toward; discourage
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

out in the cold
have (<i>or</i> get) cold feet
in the cold

Origin of cold

  • Middle English from Old English ceald gel- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English cold, from Old English cald, ċeald (“cold”), from Proto-Germanic *kaldaz, a participle form of *kalaną (“to be cold”), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (“cold”). Cognate with Scots cald, cauld (“cold”), West Frisian kâld (“cold”), Dutch koud (“cold”), Low German kold, koolt, koold (“cold”), German kalt (“cold”), Danish kold (“cold”), Norwegian Bokmål kald (“cold”), Swedish kall (“cold”).

    From Wiktionary