Message meaning

mĕsĭj
The definition of a message is a short communication sent from one person to another or the central theme or idea of a communication.

An example of a message is what you leave for someone on an answering machine when you have tried to call him and he wasn't there.

An example of a message is a speech made before the press that gives them information on your political position.

An example of a message is the important idea of world peace; people try to spread the idea - or message - of world peace.

An example of a message is an email you receive in your inbox.

noun
15
4
To send a message to.
verb
10
3
To send (something) as a message; usually refers to electronic messaging.

She messaged me the information yesterday.

Please message the final report by fax.

verb
6
1
A basic thesis or lesson; a moral.

A play with a message.

noun
6
2
A communication, or what is communicated; any concept or information conveyed.

We've just received an urgent message from the President.

noun
5
2
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Recorded information or a stream of data in plain or encrypted language put in a format specified for transmission in a telecommunication system. In the computer field, certain object-oriented programming languages such as Smalltalk and Objective-C use messages—actually instructions to an object—to perform particular tasks. In this context, a message is similar to a member function. In the Objective-C runtime environment, messages can still be forwarded even if an object does not recognize (that is, respond to) a particular message. GNU Free Documentation License. Message. [Online, April 30, 2005.] GNU Free Documentation License Website. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Message.
3
1
An underlying theme or conclusion to be drawn from something.

The main message of the novel is that time heals all wounds.

noun
3
1
The errand or function of a messenger.
noun
2
1
(1) (noun) Any data transmitted over a network. Just as a program becomes a "job" when it runs in the computer, data becomes a "message" when it is transmitted. See communications protocol, email, text messaging and instant messaging.
2
1
A complete thought or idea prepared for transmission. A message may consist of a single discrete set of data prepared for transmission as a whole, or it may be segmented, fragmented, or otherwise divided into multiple parts of the whole in the form of frames, blocks, packets, cells or other sets of data for enhanced effectiveness in transmission, switching or routing, format conversion, storage, etc.At the destination, the fragments or segments are reassembled into the complete message.
2
1
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abbreviation
2
1
(intransitive) To send a message or messages; to be capable of sending messages.

We've implemented a new messaging service.

The runaway computer program was messaging non-stop.

verb
2
1
To send as a message.

Messaged the report by cable.

verb
2
2
To send a message; communicate.
verb
2
2
A communication passed or sent by speech, in writing, by signals, etc.
noun
2
2
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noun
2
2
To send (as) a message.
verb
2
2
A statement made or read before a gathering.

A retiring coach's farewell message.

noun
2
3
A formal, official communication.

The President's message to Congress.

noun
2
3
To send a message to; to transmit a message to, e.g. as text via a cell phone.

Just message me for directions.

I messaged her about the concert.

verb
2
3
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off message
  • Deviating from a planned set of remarks or positions:.
    The aides worried that the candidate would make a gaffe if he went off message.
idiom
2
0
on message
  • Following a planned set of remarks or positions.
idiom
2
0
get the message
  • To understand the implications of an action or, often, specif., of a hint, insinuation, etc.
idiom
2
0
send a message
  • To convey or communicate one's feelings, desires, etc., often, specif., in a subtle or indirect manner.
idiom
2
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

get the message
send a message

Origin of message

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin missāticum from Latin missus past participle of mittere to send

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French, from Late Latin missaticum, from Latin mittere, missum (“to send").

    From Wiktionary