Relay meaning

rēlā
To relay is defined as to pass along.

An example of to relay is to get a message to someone.

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The definition of a relay is a race, or the act of passing something along from one person or group to another.

An example of a relay is a race during a school field day.

An example of relay is the act of getting a message to someone.

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An act of passing something along from one person, group, or station to another.
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A device that responds to a small current or voltage change by activating switches or other devices in an electric circuit.
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A crew of workers who relieve another crew; a shift.
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A fresh team, as of horses or dogs, to relieve weary animals in a hunt, task, or journey.
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To supply with fresh relays.
verb
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To control or retransmit by means of a relay.
verb
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A fresh supply of dogs, horses, etc. kept in readiness to relieve others in a hunt, on a journey, etc.
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A crew of workers relieving others at work; shift.
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An act or instance of conveying or transmitting by or as by relays.
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An electromagnetic or electronic switching device activated by a signal and usually used to control a large current or to activate another device or circuit.
noun
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To convey by relays.
verb
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To convey as if by relays; receive and pass on (a message, news, etc.)
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To supply or replace with a relay or relays.
verb
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To control, operate, or send on by a relay.
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An electrical switch that is operated by an electromagnet, such as a solenoid. When a small current passes through the electromagnet's coiled wire, it produces a magnetic field that attracts a movable iron bar, causing it to pivot and open or close the switch.
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An electrical switch that allows a low power to control a higher one. A small current energizes the relay, which closes a gate, allowing a large current to flow through.In the radio world, a relay is a device that receives a signal from a low-power or distant transmitter and retransmits it on the same or different frequency in order to increase the coverage area. For example, the signal from a broadcast facility in a valley would only propagate within that valley. A relay site at the top of a nearby mountain would rebroadcast the original signal to a wider audience. In commercial TV and radio, these relay sites are known as "translators."
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(hunting, now rare) A new set of hounds. [from 15th c.]
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(now chiefly historical) A new set of horses kept along a specific route so that they can replace animals that are tired. [from 17th c.]
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A series of vehicles travelling in sequence. [from 18th c.]
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(athletics) A track and field discipline where runners take turns in carrying a baton from start to finish. Most common events are 4x100 meter and 4x400 meter competitions. [from 19th c.]
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(electronics) An electrical actuator that allows a relatively small electrical voltage or current to control a larger voltage or current. [from 19th c.]
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(now rare) To place (people or horses) in relays, such that one can take over form another. [from 18th c.]
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(intransitive, now rare) To take on a new relay of horses; to change horses. [from 19th c.]
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To pass on or transfer (information). [from 19th c.]
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Alternative spelling of re-lay.
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To lay (for example, flooring or railroad track) again.

He had to re-lay the tiles because the cement was too dry.

verb
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To pass along by or as if by relay.

Relayed the message to his boss.

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Origin of relay

  • Middle English relai fresh team of dogs for a hunt from Old French from relaier to relay re- re- laier to leave (of Germanic origin leip- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French relai (“reserve pack of hounds"), from relaier (“to exchange tired animals for fresh"); literally, "to leave behind", from Old French relaier (“to leave behind"), from re- + laier (“to leave"), of uncertain origin.

    From Wiktionary

  • re- +"Ž lay

    From Wiktionary