Communicate meaning

kə-myo͝onĭ-kāt
(ecclesiastical) To receive Communion.
verb
9
2
To pass along; impart; transmit (as heat, motion, or a disease)
verb
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2
To make known; give (information, signals, or messages)
verb
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2
(intransitive) To express or convey ideas, either through verbal or nonverbal means; to have intercourse, to exchange information. [from 16th c.]

Many deaf people communicate with sign language.

I feel I hardly know him; I just wish he'd communicate with me a little more.

verb
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0
(intransitive) To be connected with (another room, vessel etc.) by means of an opening or channel. [from 16th c.]

The living room communicates with the back garden by these French windows.

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The definition of communicate means to exchange ideas or make something known.

An example of to communicate is to call a friend on the phone.

verb
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1
To spread (a disease, for example) to others; transmit.

A carrier who communicated typhus.

verb
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1
To have an interchange, as of ideas.
verb
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1
To express oneself in such a way that one is readily and clearly understood.
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To be connected, one with another.

Apartments that communicate.

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To receive Holy Communion.
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To be connected.

The living room communicates with the dining room.

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To impart.
  • To impart or transmit (information or knowledge) to someone; to make known, to tell. [from 16th c.]
    It is vital that I communicate this information to you.
  • To impart or transmit (an intangible quantity, substance); to give a share of. [from 16th c.]
    To communicate motion by means of a crank.
  • To pass on (a disease) to another person, animal etc. [from 17th c.]
    The disease was mainly communicated via rats and other vermin.
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(intransitive, Christianity) To receive the bread and wine at a celebration of the Eucharist; to take part in Holy Communion. [from 16th c.]
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(Christianity) To administer the Holy Communion to (someone). [from 16th c.]
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Origin of communicate

  • Latin commūnicāre commūnicāt- from commūnis common mei-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from Latin commūnicātus, perfect passive participle of commūnicō (“share, impart; make common”), from commūnis (“common”).

    From Wiktionary