Commune meaning

kə-myo͝on
The definition of commune is to feel in close contact.

When you go camping to get close to nature, this is an example of when you commune with nature.

verb
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Commune is defined as a group of people living together in a shared community.

When a group of religious people go to live together in one area of town, this is an example of a religious commune.

noun
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To receive the Eucharist.
verb
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To receive Holy Communion.
verb
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To be in a state of intimate, heightened sensitivity and receptivity, as with one's surroundings.

Hikers communing with nature.

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The smallest local political division of various European countries, governed by a mayor and municipal council.
noun
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Intimate conversation.
noun
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The common people.
noun
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The smallest administrative district of local government in France, Belgium, and some other countries in Europe.
noun
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A strictly organized collective farm, as in China.
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A small group of people living communally and sharing in work, earnings, etc.
noun
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A small community, often rural, whose members share in the ownership of property, and in the division of labour; the members of such a community.
noun
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A local political division in many European countries.
noun
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To converse together with sympathy and confidence; to interchange sentiments or feelings; to take counsel.
verb
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(intransitive, followed by with) To communicate (with) spiritually; to be together (with); to contemplate or absorb.

He spent a week in the backcountry, communing with nature.

verb
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To receive the communion.
verb
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A community.
  • A local body for self-government, esp. in medieval towns.
noun
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commune with oneself
  • To think; ponder.
idiom
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the Commune
  • The revolutionary government of Paris from 1792 to 1794.
  • The revolutionary government established in Paris from March 18 to May 28, 1871.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

commune with oneself
the Commune

Origin of commune

  • Middle English comunen to have common dealings with, converse from Old French communer to make common, share (from commun common common) and perhaps from Old French communier to share in the Communion (from Late Latin commūnicāre) (from Latin to communicate communicate)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French independent municipality from Old French comugne from Medieval Latin commūnia community from neuter of Latin commūnis common mei-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French commune, in turn deriving from Latin.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French comuner (“to share”).

    From Wiktionary