Talk meaning

tôk
A speech or lecture.

He gave a talk on art.

noun
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A subject of conversation.

A musical that is the talk of the town.

noun
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3
To spread rumors; gossip.

If you do that, people will talk.

verb
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4
To make a speech, esp. a somewhat informal one.
verb
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To put into spoken words; utter.
verb
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To use in speaking.

To talk Spanish, to talk slang.

verb
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To put into a specified condition, state of mind, etc. by talking.

To talk oneself hoarse.

verb
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A speech, esp. a somewhat informal one.
noun
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A formal discussion; conference.
noun
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Rumor; gossip.
noun
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The subject of conversation, gossip, etc.
noun
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Empty or frivolous remarks, discussion, or conversation.
noun
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A particular kind of speech; dialect; lingo.
noun
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Sounds, as by an animal, suggestive of speech.
noun
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We need to have a talk about your homework.

noun
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There's a talk about Shakespeare on tonight.

noun
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(preceded by the) A major topic of social discussion.

She is the talk of the day. The musical is the talk of the town.

noun
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(not preceded by an article) Empty boasting, promises or claims.

The party leader's speech was all talk.

noun
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To communicate, usually by means of speech.

Although I don't speak Chinese I managed to talk with the villagers using signs and gestures.

They sat down to talk business. We talk French sometimes.

verb
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(informal) To discuss.

They sat down to talk business. We're not talking rocket science here: it should be easy.

verb
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(intransitive, slang) To confess, especially implicating others.

Suppose he talks? She can be relied upon not to talk. They tried to make me talk.

verb
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(intransitive) To criticize someone for something of which one is guilty oneself.

I am not the one to talk. She is a fine one to talk. You should talk. Look who's talking.

verb
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(intransitive) To gossip; to create scandal.

People will talk. Aren't you afraid the neighbours will talk?

verb
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Talk means speech or conversation.

An example of talk is when you and your friend sit around and have a chat.

An example of talk is when you and a significant other have a serious conversation about the state of your relationship.

An example of talk is when a famous writer gives a formal presentation about how he became a writer.

noun
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To talk is to speak, to have the power to speak, or to have a formal conversation.

An example of talk is when you open your mouth and say words.

An example of talk is when a baby first learns to talk.

An example of talk is when you tell someone that something is on your mind and then you have a talk about it.

verb
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To allude to something.

Are you talking about last week?

verb
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To reveal information concerning oneself or others, especially under pressure.

Has the prisoner talked?

verb
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To be efficacious.

Money talks.

verb
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1
To utter or pronounce (words).

Their son is talking sentences now.

verb
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To speak or know how to speak (a language or a language variety).

The passenger talked French with the flight crew. Can you talk the local dialect?

verb
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To cause (someone) to be in a certain state or to do something by talking.

They talked me into coming.

verb
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An exchange of ideas or opinions; a conversation.

We had a nice talk over lunch.

noun
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Hearsay, rumor, or speculation.

There is talk of bankruptcy.

noun
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A conference or negotiation.

Peace talks.

noun
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Something, such as the sounds of animals, felt to resemble human talk.

Whale talk.

noun
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To express ideas by speech substitutes.

To talk by signs.

verb
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To speak emptily or trivially; chatter.
verb
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To gossip.
verb
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To confer; consult.
verb
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To make noises suggestive of speech.
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To reveal secret information; esp., to confess or inform on someone.
verb
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talk big
  • To brag.
idiom
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talk sense
  • To speak rationally and coherently.
idiom
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talk the talk
  • To speak knowledgeably about something, especially something that one claims or implies one can do well.
idiom
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big talk
  • Bragging or boasting talk.
idiom
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have a talk with
  • To admonish or caution.
idiom
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make talk
  • To talk idly, as in an effort to pass time.
  • To cause gossip.
idiom
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talk around
  • To talk (a person) over; persuade.
idiom
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talk at
  • To speak to in a way that indicates a response is not really desired.
idiom
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talk away
  • To pass (a period of time) by talking.
  • To talk continuously; chatter.
idiom
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talk back
  • To answer impertinently or rudely.
idiom
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talk big
  • To boast; brag.
idiom
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talk down
  • To silence by talking louder, longer, or more effectively than.
  • To aid (a pilot) in landing by giving spoken instructions.
idiom
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talk down to
  • To talk in a patronizing way to, as by using pointedly simple speech.
idiom
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talk someone's ear off
  • To talk to someone at great length or without pause.
idiom
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talk into
  • To persuade (someone) to do something.
idiom
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talk out
  • To discuss (a problem, etc.) at length in an effort to reach an understanding.
idiom
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talk out of
  • To dissuade (someone) from doing something.
idiom
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talk over
  • To have a conversation about; discuss.
  • To win (a person) over to one's view by talking; persuade.
idiom
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talk up
  • To promote or praise in discussion.
  • To speak loudly and clearly.
  • To speak boldly, frankly, etc.
idiom
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Origin of talk

  • Middle English talken del-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English talken, talkien, from Old English *tealcian (“to talk, chat"), from Proto-Germanic *talkōnÄ… (“to talk, chatter"), frequentative form of Proto-Germanic *talōnÄ… (“to count, recount, tell"), from Proto-Indo-European *dol-, *del- (“to aim, calculate, adjust, count"), equivalent to tell +"Ž -k. Cognate with Scots talk (“to talk"), Eastern Frisian talken (“to talk, chat"), Low German Talk (“talk"). Related also to Danish tale (“to talk, speak"), Swedish tala (“to talk, speak, say, chatter"), Icelandic tala (“to talk"), Old English talian (“to count, calculate, reckon, account, consider, think, esteem, value; argue; tell, relate; impute, assign"). More at tale.

    From Wiktionary