Count Definition

kount
counted, counting, counts
verb
counted, counting, counts
To name numbers in regular order to (a certain number)
To count five.
Webster's New World
To add up, one by one, by units or groups, so as to get a total.
Count the money.
Webster's New World
To be taken into account; have importance, value, etc.
His opinions don't count.
Webster's New World
To recite numerals in ascending order up to and including.
Count three before firing.
American Heritage
To check by numbering off; inventory.
Webster's New World
Advertisement
noun
counts
The act of counting; adding or numbering.
Webster's New World
The number reached by counting; total number or quantity.
Webster's New World
The totality of specific items in a particular sample.
A white blood cell count.
American Heritage
A reckoning or accounting.
Webster's New World
Regard; notice; account.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
estimateguess
Advertisement
other
Any of the individual causes of action or allegations that the defendant committed an offense in a complaint, indictment, information, or similar pleading.
Webster's New World Law
idiom
count heads
  • To make a count of members, attendees, or participants.
American Heritage
and counting
  • so far, but with more expected

    four straight rainy days, and counting

Webster's New World
count in
  • to include
Webster's New World
count off
  • to separate into equal divisions by counting
Webster's New World
count out
  • to disregard; omit
  • to declare (a boxer) defeated when he has remained down for a count of ten
Webster's New World
Advertisement

Other Word Forms of Count

Noun

Singular:
count
Plural:
counts

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Count

Origin of Count

  • From Middle English counten, from Anglo-Norman conter, from Old French conter (“add up; tell a story”), from Latin computare, present active infinitive of computō (“I compute”). Displaced native Middle English tellen (“to count”) (from Old English tellan) and Middle English rimen (“to count, enumerate”) (from Old English rīman).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English counten from Old French conter from Latin computāre to calculate com- com- putāre to think pau-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English counte from Old French conte from Late Latin comes comit- occupant of any state office from Latin companion ei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French comte, conte, from Latin comes, comitem.

    From Wiktionary

Advertisement

Find Similar Words

Find similar words to count using the buttons below.

Words Starting With

Words Ending With

Unscrambles

count
Advertisement