Sway meaning

swā
Influence or control.

The mayor has a lot of sway in our town.

noun
8
1
To exert influence or control over.

His speech swayed the voters.

verb
4
0
A rocking or swinging motion.

The old song caused a little sway in everyone in the room.

noun
3
0
To sway is to move rhythmically back and forth or to influence someone's behavior, action or thoughts.

An example of sway is when you move back and forth with a baby in your arms to try to relax the baby.

An example of sway is when you try, and succeed, to convince someone to share your political views by giving them details about your party.

verb
3
1
To swing back and forth or to and fro.
verb
2
0
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Sway is a rhythmic back and forth movement.

An example of sway is the act of moving rhythmically from side to side.

noun
1
0
To cause to swing back and forth or to and fro.

The breeze swayed the wheat.

verb
1
0
(nautical) To hoist (a mast or yard) into position.
verb
1
0
The act of moving from side to side with a swinging motion.
noun
1
0
(old poet.) To rule; reign; hold sway.
verb
1
0
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(naut.) To hoist (a mast, yard, etc.) into place.
verb
1
0
A swaying or being swayed; movement to the side; a swinging, leaning, fluctuation, etc.
noun
1
0
Influence, force, or control.

Moved by the sway of passion.

noun
1
0
Sovereign power or authority; rule; dominion.
noun
1
0
The act of swaying; a swaying motion; a swing or sweep of a weapon.
noun
1
0
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Influence, weight, or authority that inclines to one side; as, the sway of desires.

I doubt I'll hold much sway with someone so powerful.

noun
1
0
Preponderance; turn or cast of balance.
noun
1
0
noun
1
0
A switch or rod used by thatchers to bind their work.
noun
1
0
The maximum amplitude of a vehicle's lateral motion.
noun
1
0
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To move or swing from side to side; or backward and forward; to rock.

The trees swayed in the breeze.

Sway to the music.

verb
1
0
To move or wield with the hand; to swing; to wield.

To sway the sceptre.

verb
1
0
To influence or direct by power, authority, persuasion, or by moral force; to rule; to govern; to guide. Compare persuade.

Do you think you can sway their decision?

verb
1
0
To cause to incline or swing to one side, or backward and forward; to bias; to turn; to bend; warp.

Reeds swayed by the wind.

Judgment swayed by passion.

verb
1
0
(nautical) To hoist (a mast or yard) into position.

To sway up the yards.

verb
1
0
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To be drawn to one side by weight or influence; to lean; to incline.
verb
1
0
To have weight or influence.
verb
1
0
To bear sway; to rule; to govern.
verb
1
0
To incline or bend to one side; veer.

She swayed and put out a hand to steady herself.

verb
1
1
To cause to incline or bend.

The wind swayed the trees toward the house.

verb
1
1
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hold sway
  • to reign or prevail
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of sway

  • Middle English sweien probably of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Earlier swey (“to fall, swoon"), from Middle English sweyen, from Old Norse sveigja (“to bend, bow"), from Proto-Germanic *swaigijanÄ… (compare Saterland Frisian swooie (“to swing, wave, wobble"), Dutch zwaaien, Dutch Low Saxon sweuen (“to sway in the wind"), from Proto-Indo-European *swaig- (compare Lithuanian svaÄ©gti (“to become giddy or dizzy"), the second element of Avestan [script?] (pairi-Å¡xuaxta, “to surround"), Sanskrit [script?] (svájate, “he embraces, enfolds")). Cognate to Proto-Slavic *čьvati «swell, become bigger», Old Greek κυέω (kyéo, “become pregnant").

    From Wiktionary