Clout meaning

klout
Frequency:
The definition of clout means strong influence or a clout is a blow or a punch.

An example of clout is intense political power.

An example of a clout is a punch to the face.

noun
8
1
A blow, especially with the fist.
noun
8
1
To hit, especially with the fist.
verb
8
1
A blow, with or as with the hand; rap.
noun
6
0
(archery) A form of long-distance shooting in which archers aim at a large target laid out on the ground with a flag in the center.
noun
3
1
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Influence or effectiveness, especially political.
noun
1
0
(now chiefly dial.) To patch or mend coarsely.
verb
0
0
(informal) To strike, as with the hand.
verb
0
0
(informal) To hit (a ball) hard.
verb
0
0
(regional, informal) A blow with the hand.
noun
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0
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(informal) A home run.
noun
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(archery) The center of the butt at which archers shoot; probably once a piece of white cloth or a nail head.
noun
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(regional, dated) A swaddling cloth.
noun
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(archaic) A cloth; a piece of cloth or leather; a patch; a rag.
noun
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(archaic) An iron plate on an axletree or other wood to keep it from wearing; a washer.
noun
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0
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To hit, especially with the fist.
verb
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0
To cover with cloth, leather, or other material; to bandage; patch, or mend, with a clout.
verb
0
0
To stud with nails, as a timber, or a boot sole.
verb
0
0
To join or patch clumsily.
verb
0
0
To clout is defined as to strike with the hand or to hit a ball hard.

An example of to clout is to punch someone in the arm.

verb
0
1
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A piece of cloth, especially a baby's diaper.
noun
0
1
A blow, especially with the fist.
noun
0
1
To hit, especially with the fist.
verb
0
1
To guard with an iron plate, as an axletree.
verb
0
1

Origin of clout

  • Middle English back of the hand, slap probably from clout cloth patch, metal plate, fragment clout1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English back of the hand, slap probably from clout cloth patch, metal plate, fragment clout1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English cloth patch, shred of clothing probably from Old English clūt

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English clūt, from Proto-Germanic *klūtaz, from Proto-Indo-European *glūdos. Cognate with Old Norse klútr (“kerchief”) (Swedish klut, Danish klud), Middle High German klōz (“lump”) (German Kloß), dialect Russian глуда (gluda). See also cleat. The sense "influence, especially political" originated in the dialect of Chicago, but has become widespread.

    From Wiktionary